Geocoding and geosearch

Locators allow you to find addresses and places that you can visualize on a map, insert as stops for a route, and load as input for spatial analysis. ArcGIS Online locators include geosearch and geocoding as follows:

  • Geosearch (also known as location search)—Locate an address or point of interest and have the map zoom to that location. The result can be displayed on the map, but the result is not stored in any way for later use. Geosearch is available to anyone who accesses Map Viewer or a public app that includes a location search on a map. It does not require an organizational account or consume credits (but you are limited to 1 million geosearches per month).
  • Geocoding—Convert an address or place to an x,y coordinate and append the result to an existing record in a database. Mapping is not always involved, but placing the results on a map may be part of a workflow. Batch geocoding and reverse geocoding fall into this category. An organizational account with the premium content geocoding privilege is required to access ArcGIS World Geocoding Service, and any views of it, for batch geocoding.

    Note:

    Reverse geocoding is not supported for views of ArcGIS World Geocoding Service.

By default, ArcGIS Online uses ArcGIS World Geocoding Service to find addresses, cities, landmarks, business names, and postal codes in more than 100 countries around the world. Additionally, ArcGIS World Geocoding Service is used to find the location of x,y coordinates using longitude and latitude, as well as coordinate reference systems such as Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) and United States National Grid (USNG).

If your organization wants to optimize search results for addresses and places of interest, members with privileges to create content can create a new view of ArcGIS World Geocoding Service to search only for specific types of locations within an area of interest. For example, you might create a locator view to limit search results to a particular country or area or to only return results that match a specific category such as street addresses or airports. Once you create a locator view, members of the default administrator role can configure the organization so it uses your locator view when members perform geosearches.

Note:

Using ArcGIS World Geocoding Service or views of this locator for batch geocoding (including publishing CSV or Microsoft Excel files as hosted feature layers) consumes credits. Using locators for geosearch does not consume credits.

An organizational account with the premium content geocoding privilege is required to use locator views for batch geocoding.

In addition, if your organization needs to geocode addresses or places based on its own data, administrators can configure your organization to use its own locators running on an ArcGIS Server site, for geosearch, geocoding, or both. For example, an oil organization could add locators to search their oil wells, or a city could add a locator to find their fire hydrants.

If you add additional locators or locator views, members see an arrow in the geosearch box and can choose which locator or view to use.

Create a locator view

You can create a new view of ArcGIS World Geocoding Service to search only for specific types of locations within an area of interest. For example, you may want a locator view to limit search results to particular areas, or you may want to enforce a specific level of precision when members perform batch geocoding of addresses.

To create and configure a locator view, do the following:

  1. Verify that you are signed in to your organization and have privileges to create content.
  2. From the My Content tab of the content page, click Create and click Locator (view).
  3. Specify a title, tags, and summary for the locator, and choose a folder in which to save the locator item.
  4. Click OK to create the locator view item.

    The item page for the locator view you created opens to the Settings tab.

  5. At the top of the Settings tab, click Locator (view) Settings.
  6. From the drop-down menu, select the type of location you want to find:
    • All Types—Choose this option if you don't want any restrictions on the types of locations returned.
    • Addresses, Postal Codes and Populated Places—Choose this option to limit results to streets, cities, states, or postal codes.
    • Coordinates—Choose this option to limit results to MGRS or a specific format for latitude, longitude.
    • Places of Interest—Choose this option to limit results to the names of places or landmarks.
  7. If you chose a category other than All Types in the previous step, further refine the location filter as needed by checking the boxes for the categories you want to search. For example:
    • If you chose Addresses, Postal Codes and Populated Places and only want ArcGIS World Geocoding Service to return matches with street address or better, check the Point Address and Street Address boxes.
    • If you chose Coordinates and want to make latitude, longitude the accepted format for coordinates, check the Latitude, Longitude box.
    • If you chose Places of Interest and only want ArcGIS World Geocoding Service to return matches to airports, check the Airport box.
  8. Specify where you want to search for locations as follows:
    • Anywhere in the world—Select this option to search for locations globally.
    • In selected countries/regions—Select this option to search for locations in specific countries. Search or browse for the countries you want and select them one at a time until you've made all of your selections.
      Note:

      If your data contains a country value, search results will include any countries explicitly defined in the data. However, if countries are not explicitly defined in the data, results will be restricted to the country or countries you define using this locator view setting.

    • Within a specified area—Select this option to define the extent of an area to search for locations. Click Set Area and define the extent. Click OK when finished.
  9. If you chose Addresses, Postal Codes and Populated Places or Places of Interest for the type of location you want to find, choose one of the following to specify your preference for displaying locations:
    • On the side of the street (routing location)
    • On the rooftop or parcel centroid (address location)
    Note:

    Your preference may not be available for all locations. If the selected preference is not available for a location, the location will be displayed with the highest precision available.

  10. Specify your preference for returning city names as follows:
    • As defined for the country—Keep this option selected to return the default city name defined for the country. For example, cities in the United States are returned by default using the postal city name.
    • Postal city name—Select this option to return the primary postal city name even if it's different from the city name entered in the search. The postal city name is the primary name assigned to the postal code of the address. For example, the 45420 postal code in Ohio has a primary postal city value of Dayton. Addresses in the city of Kettering are assigned this postal code, which means that searches for addresses in Kettering are returned as Dayton addresses. If this option is selected and an organization member searches for 2109 E Dorothy Ln, Kettering, OH, 45420, the match label returned is 2109 E Dorothy Ln, Dayton, Ohio, 45420, even though the address is within the Kettering city limits.
    • Local city name—Select this option to return the locally known city name even if it's different from the city name entered in the search. The local city name is the name of the city in which the address is located, and may be different from the postal city. For example, if this option is selected, a search for 2109 E Dorothy Ln, Dayton, OH, 45420—an address in Kettering, Ohio—returns the match label of 2109 E. Dorothy Ln, Kettering, Ohio, 45420, even though Dayton is included in the search string and the postal code entered has a postal city value of Dayton.
    • Matched city name—Select this option to return the matched city name value when the city name entered in a search matches any of the local city name or postal city name values.
    Note:

    Not all addresses have postal city and local city values assigned to them. If the requested preferred city does not exist in the data, a different city value is returned based on default address formats.

  11. Specify your preference for returning street names as follows:
    • As defined for the country—Keep this option selected to return the default street name. The default street name is the matched street name.
    • Matched street name—Select this option to return the matched street name value when the street name entered in a search matches any of the supported street names assigned to an address.
    • Primary street name—Select this option to return the primary street name even if it's different from the alternate street name entered in the search. The primary street name is the primary name assigned to a street. For example, if this option is selected, a search for CA-138, Pearblossom, CA returns the match label of Pearblossom Hwy, Pearblossom, California, 93553.
  12. Click Save to save your locator view settings.
  13. Share your locator view with the public or with your organization.

    You must share the locator view to make it available to members of your organization or the public. Once it's shared, an administrator can add it to your organization's list of locators available for members to use for geosearch and batch geocoding.

    Note:

    Anonymous users will only have access to your locator view if you share it with the public. Locator views that are shared with the organization and included in your organization's list of locators are only accessible to organization members. Anonymous users will not be able to perform geosearch in any apps using locators that are only shared with the organization.

If your locator view is added to the organization's list of locators, it is recommended that you enable delete protection on the locator item to prevent accidental deletion. Once it's added, if you decide to delete your locator view in the future, your administrator must first remove it from the organization's list of locators.

Location types and categories

This section describes the location types, categories, and subcategories available when you configure your locator view.

Addresses, Postal Codes and Populated Places

When you choose Addresses, Postal Codes and Populated Places as the types of locations you want to find, you can further refine the locator view's search results by selecting the categories and subcategories you want to search. The following categories for Addresses, Postal Codes and Populated Places are available:

  • Address—Selecting this category automatically includes all of the address subcategories listed in the table below. This category limits search results to places that can be categorized as addresses while filtering out results for places of interest, postal codes, countries, or states. For more precise search results, choose any combination of address subcategories that meet your search requirements.
  • Postal—Selecting this category limits search results to any type of postal code match, including 5-digit and longer postal code formats. To limit search results to matches that are at least this precise, select both the Postal category and the top-level Address category.
  • Populated Place—Selecting this category automatically includes all of the populated place subcategories listed in the table below. This category limits search results to administrative divisions (or boundaries), such as cities, provinces, or countries, while filtering out results for addresses, places of interest, and postal codes. For more precise search results, choose any combination of populated place subcategories that meet your search requirements.

CategorySubcategoryDescription

Address

Point Address

A point address is a street address based on points that represent house and building locations. The point addresses represent the rooftop, or actual, location of the address. Typically, this is the most spatially accurate match level. Reference data contains address points with associated house numbers and street names, along with administrative divisions and optional postal code information—for example, 380 New York St, Redlands, CA, 92373.

A locator view configured with this subcategory limits results to these highly precise address points, which will allow you to avoid matching to any less precise address points if you require very high precision in matching.

Street Address

A street address is different from a point address in that the house number in a street address is interpolated from a range of numbers. Reference data contains street center lines with house number ranges, along with administrative divisions and optional postal code information—for example, 647 Haight St, San Francisco, CA, 94117.

A locator view configured with this subcategory limits results to an interpolated result. If you want to limit results to matches that are at least this precise, you should select both this subcategory and the Point Address category.

Intersection

An intersection is a street address consisting of a street intersection, along with city and optional state and postal code information—for example, Redlands Blvd & New York St, Redlands, CA, 92373.

A locator view configured with this subcategory limits results to intersections instead of complete addresses that exist on only one street.

Street Name

A street name is similar to a street address but without the house number. It contains street center lines with associated street names (no numbered address ranges), along with administrative divisions and optional postal code information—for example, W Olive Ave, Redlands, CA, 92373.

A locator view configured with this subcategory limits results to street names only. If you want to limit results to matches that are at least this precise, you should select this subcategory as well as the Point Address and Street Address subcategories.

Subaddress

A subaddress is a subset of a point address that represents a house or building subset location such as an apartment unit, floor, or individual building within a building complex—for example, 3836 Emerald Ave, Suite C, La Verne, CA, 91750.

A locator view configured with this subcategory limits results to subaddress points that include a house number, street name, and subaddress elements, along with administrative divisions and optional postal code information, while leaving out other types of address matches.

Postal

No subcategories

A locator view configured with the Postal category returns any type of postal code match, including 5-digit (for example, 92373) and other postal code formats. To limit results to matches that are at least this precise, select Postal and the top-level Address category.

Populated Place

Neighborhood

A neighborhood is a subsection of a city, smaller than a district and larger than a sector.

City

A locator configured with this subcategory limits results to cities only—for example, the city of Venice in Italy.

Subregion

A subregion is a subset of a state or province, such as a county in the United States—for example Adams County in the state of Wisconsin.

Region

A region is a subsection of a country, typically a state or province—for example, the province of Ontario in Canada.

Country

A country is the highest administrative division, also known as a nation—for example, Japan.

Sector

A sector is an administrative division larger than a block and smaller than a neighborhood, representing a subdivision of a neighborhood or district, or a collection of blocks.

Block

A block is the smallest administrative area for a country, representing a subdivision of a sector or neighborhood, or a named city block.

District

A district is an administrative division smaller than a city and larger than a neighborhood—for example, a municipal district.

Metro Area

A metropolitan (metro) area is an urban conglomeration consisting of a large city and the smaller cities surrounding it—for example, Greater Tokyo.

Territory

A territory is a large administrative division, smaller than a country and larger than a state or province—for example, the Yukon territory in Canada.

Zone

A zone is a category representing an unofficial administrative area that does not belong to a country, such as a disputed area or a grouping of other administrative zones—for example, Central America.

Coordinates

When you choose Coordinates as the types of locations you want to find, you can further refine the locator view's search results by selecting the categories you want to search. These are described in the table below.

CategoryDescription

Longitude, Latitude

This category represents geographic (x,y) coordinates. X refers to longitude (east-west coordinates), and y refers to latitude (north-south coordinates). Coordinates are entered and returned as x,y.

Latitude, Longitude

This category represents geographic (x,y) coordinates. X refers to longitude (east-west coordinates) and y refers to latitude (north-south coordinates). Coordinates are entered and returned as y,x.

MGRS

This category represents Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) coordinates.

USNG

This category represents the United States National Grid (USNG) coordinate system.

Places of Interest

When you choose Places of Interest as the types of locations you want to find, you can further refine the locator view's search results by selecting the categories you want to search. These are described in the table below.

CategoryDescription

Education

This category represents all types of educational institutions, including universities, primary schools, and vocational schools.

Food

This category represents restaurants of all types.

Shops and Service

This category represents all types of commercial or retail businesses.

Airport

This category represents airports, designated either by name or by airport code.

Requirements for configuring your own locators

ArcGIS Online supports locators running on ArcGIS Server 10.0 and later as locators for geosearch. When used for geosearch, the locators can be internal or external. Internal locators only work for geosearch when Map Viewer or other ArcGIS Online clients have access to those internal locators. For example, if your organization shares apps with the public, only users who have access to your internal locators will be able to find places with those apps.

ArcGIS Online also supports locators running on ArcGIS Server 10.1 and later as geocoders for batch geocoding. Unlike geosearch, external locators that are hosted outside your firewall are required for batch geocoding. This is because ArcGIS Online needs to access the geocodeAddresses operation on your locator to perform batch geocoding. If your external locator is secure, you must first create a secure service item in ArcGIS Online that stores the credentials required to access your locator. You can then configure the service URL provided by the secure service item as a locator.

When you configure your own locator for batch geocoding, you should provision sufficient compute resources for your locator. ArcGIS Online submits many concurrent requests when performing batch geocoding to improve performance, so your own locators should have sufficient compute resources to handle concurrent requests without severely affecting processing times for the requests.

ArcGIS Online supports single-field locators from ArcGIS Server 10.0 and later. Locators from ArcGIS Server 10.0 and internal locators can be used for geosearch but not to batch geocode. External locators from ArcGIS Server 10.1 or later are required to perform batch geocoding. Internal locators only work for geosearch when Map Viewer or other ArcGIS Online clients have access to those internal locators. For example, if your organization shares apps with the public, only users who have access to your internal locators will be able to find places with those apps. ArcGIS Online secure service items are not currently supported in ArcGIS Desktop. To batch geocode, your locator needs to be hosted outside your firewall so ArcGIS Online can access the geocodeAddresses operation on your locator to perform batch geocoding.

Locator output fields

When you publish a hosted feature layer from a comma-separated values (CSV) file, you have the option to include information from the geocoding process as part of your hosted feature layer. This information is generated by the locator and is stored in fields in the hosted feature layer.

By default, only the location information (the x,y coordinates) is included in the hosted feature layer. If you choose the Minimal option, the hosted feature layer also includes status, score, match_addr, and addr_type fields and values, which are described in the following table. If you choose the All option, all of the fields listed in the following table are included in the hosted feature layer.

Be aware that these additional fields and values will increase the size of your hosted feature layer. How much the layer size increases depends on the number of records in your input file and which locator output field option you choose.

FieldDescription

spatialReference

The spatial reference of the output match location coordinates as specified by the wkid and latestWkid properties. The outSR input parameter determines the spatial reference. This is always returned by default.

address

Complete matching address returned for findAddressCandidates and geocodeAddresses geocode requests. This is always returned by default.

location

The point coordinates of the output match location as specified by the x and y properties. The spatial reference of the x and y coordinates is defined by the spatialReference output field. Always returned by default for findAddressCandidates and geocodeAddresses geocode requests only. Refer to the description of the locationType parameter for more information about how the location output field relates to the X and Y output attributes.

ResultID

Only returned for geocodeAddresses requests. Each record in a batch geocode response includes a ResultID value, which equals the OBJECTID value of the corresponding input address record. It can be used to join the output fields in the response to the attributes in the original address table.

Loc_name

The name of the locator used to return a particular match result.

Note:

The Loc_name field is used internally by ArcGIS software and is not intended for use by client applications.

Status

Indicates whether a batch geocode request results in a match, tie, or unmatch.

Possible values include the following:

  • M—Match. The returned address matches the request and is the highest scoring candidate.
  • T—Tie. The returned address matches the request but has the same score as one or more additional candidates.
  • U—Unmatch. No addresses match the request.

Score

A number from 1–100 indicating the degree to which the input tokens in a geocoding request match the address components in a candidate record. A score of 100 represents a perfect match, while lower scores represent decreasing match accuracy. Score is always returned by default.

Match_addr

Complete address returned for the geocode request. The format is based on address standards for the country in which the address is located.

LongLabel

A longer version of Match_addr containing more administrative information.

ShortLabel

A shortened version of Match_addr.

Addr_type

The match level for a geocode request. Supported match levels vary in different countries.

Possible values include the following:

  • Subaddress—A subset of a PointAddress that represents a house or building subaddress location, such as an apartment unit, floor, or individual building within a complex. The UnitName, UnitType, LevelName, LevelType, BldgName, and BldgType field values help to distinguish subaddresses which may be associated with the same PointAddress. Reference data consists of point features with associated house number, street name, and subaddress elements, along with administrative divisions and optional postal code; for example, 3836 Emerald Ave, Suite C, La Verne, CA, 91750.
  • PointAddress—A street address based on points that represent house and building locations. Typically, this is the most spatially accurate match level. Reference data contains address points with associated house numbers and street names, along with administrative divisions and optional postal code. The X / Y and geometry output values for a PointAddress match represent the street entry location for the address; this is the location used for routing operations. The DisplayX and DisplayY values represent the rooftop, or actual, location of the address. Example: 380 New York St, Redlands, CA, 92373.
  • StreetAddress—A street address that differs from PointAddress because the house number is interpolated from a range of numbers. Reference data contains street center lines with house number ranges, along with administrative divisions and optional postal code information, for example, 647 Haight St, San Francisco, CA, 94117.
  • StreetInt—A street address consisting of a street intersection along with city and optional state and postal code information. This is derived from StreetAddress reference data, for example, Redlands Blvd & New York St, Redlands, CA, 92373.
  • StreetAddressExt—An interpolated street address match that is returned when parameter matchOutOfRange=true and the input house number exceeds the house number range for the matched street segment.
  • DistanceMarker—A street address that represents the linear distance along a street, typically in kilometers or miles, from a designated origin location. Example: Carr 682 KM 4, Barceloneta, 00617.
  • StreetMidBlock—The estimated midpoint of a range of house numbers along a street segment that correspond to a city block. The location returned for a StreetMidBlock match is more precise than that of a StreetName match, but less precise than a StreetAddress match. Currently only functional for USA. Example: 100 Block of Grant Ave, Millville, New Jersey.
  • StreetName—Similar to a street address but without the house number. Reference data contains street centerlines with associated street names (no numbered address ranges), along with administrative divisions and optional postal code, for example, W Olive Ave, Redlands, CA, 92373.
  • Locality—A place-name representing a populated place. The Type output field provides more detailed information about the type of populated place. Possible Type values for Locality matches include Block, Sector, Neighborhood, District, City, MetroArea, County, State or Province, Territory, Country, and Zone. Example: Bogotá, COL
  • PostalLoc—A combination of postal code and city name. Reference data is typically a union of postal boundaries and administrative (locality) boundaries, for example, 7132 Frauenkirchen.
  • PostalExt—A postal code with an additional extension, such as the United States Postal Service ZIP+4. Reference data is postal code points with extensions, for example, 90210-3841.
  • Postal—Postal code. Reference data is postal code points, for example, 90210 USA.
  • POI—Points of interest. Reference data consists of businesses, landmarks, and geographic features, for example, Starbucks.
  • LatLong—An x/y coordinate pair. The LatLong addr_type is returned when an x/y coordinate pair, such as 117.155579,32.703761, is the search input.
  • XYXY is the match based on the assumption that the first coordinate of the input is longitude and the second is latitude.
  • YXYX is returned as Addr_type for the candidate which assumes that latitude is the first number in the input, followed by longitude .
  • MGRS—A Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) location, such as 46VFM5319397841.
  • USNG—A United States National Grid (USNG) location, such as 15TXN29753883. This Addr_type value is only returned when the category parameter is set to USNG in a findAddressCandidates or geocodeAddresses request.

Type

The feature type for results returned by a search. The Type field only includes a value for candidates with Addr_type = POI or Locality. As an example, for Starbucks, Type=Coffee Shop.

PlaceName

The formal name of a geocode match candidate, for example, Paris or Starbucks.

Place_addr

The full street address of a place, including street, city, and region; for example, 275 Columbus Ave, New York, New York.

Phone

The primary phone number of a place. For other searches, such as address, intersection, and postal code, the field is empty, for example, Knott's Berry Farm, Phone=(714)220-5200.

URL

The URL of the primary website for a place. For other searches, such as address, intersection, and postal code, the field is empty, for example, the University of Georgia, URL =http://www.uga.edu/.

Rank

A floating-point number value indicating the importance of a result relative to other results with the same name. For example, there are cities in France and Texas named Paris. Paris, France, has a greater population than Paris, Texas, so it has a higher rank. Rank is used to sort results for ambiguous queries such as Lincoln, where no additional information (state) is available. Rank values are based on population or feature type.

AddBldg

The name of a building, for example, Empire State Building.

AddNum

The alphanumeric value that represents the portion of an address typically known as a house number or building number, for example, in the address 380 New York Street, AddNum = 380.

This value is returned for PointAddress and StreetAddress matches only.

AddNumFrom

A value representing the beginning number of a street address range. It is relative to direction of feature digitization and is not always the smallest number in the range. This value is provided for StreetAddress results.

AddNumTo

A value representing the ending number of a street address range. It is relative to direction of feature digitization and is not always the largest number in the range. This value is provided for StreetAddress results.

AddRange

The full house number range for the street segment that an address lies on, in the format AddNumFrom-AddNumTo. For instance, the AddRange value for street address 123 Main St may be 101-199.

Side

The side of the street where an address resides relative to the direction of feature digitization. This value is not relative to the direction of travel along the street. Possible values are R(right) and L (left).

StPreDir

Address element defining the direction of a street and occurs before the primary street name, for example, North in North Main Street.

StPreType

An address element defining the leading type of a street, for example, the Spanish term Avenida in Avenida Central or the French term Rue in Rue Lapin.

StName

An address element defining the primary name of a street, for example, Main in North Main Street.

StType

An address element defining the trailing type of a street, for example, "Street" in Main Street.

StDir

An address element defining the direction of a street, which occurs after the primary street name, for example, North in Main Street North.

BldgName

The name or number of a building subunit. For example, A in building A.

BldgType

The classification of a building subunit. Examples are building, hangar, tower.

LevelType

The classification of a floor subunit. Examples are floor, level, department, wing.

LevelName

The name or number of a floor subunit. For example, 3 in level 3.

UnitType

The classification of a unit subunit. Examples are unit, apartment, flat, office, suite.

UnitName

The name or number of a unit subunit. For example, 2B in apartment 2B.

SubAddr

The full subunit value for a candidate with Addr_type=Subaddress which includes <subunit type> + <subunit name>. For instance, if the subaddress candidate is an apartment unit, SubAddr = UnitType + UnitName. Example: Apt 4B

StAddr

The street address of a place, without city and region; for example, 275 Columbus Ave.

Block

The name of the block-level administrative division for a candidate. Block is the smallest administrative area for a country. It can be described as a subdivision of sector or neighborhood or a named city block. Not commonly used.

Sector

The name of the sector-level administrative division for a candidate. Sector is a subdivision of neighborhood or district, or represents a collection of blocks. Not commonly used.

Nbrhd

The name of the neighborhood-level administrative division for a candidate. Nbhrhd is a subsection of a city or district.

District

The name of the district-level administrative division for a candidate. Subdivision of city.

City

The name of the city-level administrative division for a candidate. City is a subdivision of a subregion or region.

MetroArea

The name of the metropolitan area-level administrative division for a candidate. An urban area consisting of a large city and the smaller cities surrounding it. Can potentially intersect multiple subregions or regions. An example is Kolkata Metropolitan Area in India.

Subregion

The name of the subregion-level administrative division for a candidate. Subregion is a subdivision of a region.

Region

The name of the region-level administrative division for a candidate. Subdivision of a country or territory. Typically the largest administrative area for a country if the Territory administrative division is not used.

RegionAbbr

Abbreviated region name. The RegionAbbr value for California is CA.

Territory

The name of the territory-level administrative division for a candidate. Subdivision of country. Not commonly used. The Sudeste macroregion of Brazil, which encompasses the states of Espírito Santo, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, is an example.

Postal

An alphanumeric address element defining the primary postal code, for example, V7M 2B4 for a Canadian postal code and 92374 for a USA postal code.

PostalExt

An alphanumeric address element defining the postal code extension, for example, 8100 in USA postal code 92373-8110.

Country

A 3-character code for a country; for example, Canada = CAN. A list of supported countries and codes is available in Geocode coverage.

LangCode

A 3-character language code representing the language of the address; for example, ENG = English.

Distance

The physical distance in meters from a candidate to a specified location. The Distance output value is calculated for each candidate when the Location input parameter is passed in a request using the findAddressCandidates operation. If the Location parameter is not passed in a request, the value of Distance is zero.

X

The primary x coordinate of an address returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service in spatial reference WGS84 (WKID 4326).

Y

The primary y coordinate of an address returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service in spatial reference WGS84 (WKID 4326).

DisplayX

The display x coordinate of an address returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service in spatial reference WGS84 (WKID 4326). For most types of matches, the X and DisplayX values are the same. For matches of Addr_type PointAddress and Subaddress specifically, the values may be different. In general, for PointAddress and Subaddress matches, DisplayX represents the x coordinate value of the building rooftop or parcel centroid for the address, while the X value represents the x coordinate of the street side location for the address. There are exceptions however. Some address data sources used by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service only provide the rooftop location of PointAddress and Subaddress features; on the other hand, for some PointAddress and Subaddress features only the street side location is available. For such cases the X and DisplayX values are equivalent.

DisplayY

The display y coordinate of an address returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service in spatial reference WGS84 (WKID 4326). For most types of matches, the Y and DisplayY values are the same. For matches of Addr_type PointAddress and Subaddress specifically, the values may be different. In general, for PointAddress and Subaddress matches, DisplayY represents the y coordinate value of the building rooftop or parcel centroid for the address, while the Y value represents the y coordinate of the street side location for the address. There are exceptions however. Some address data sources used by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service only provide the rooftop location of PointAddress and Subaddress features; on the other hand, for some PointAddress and Subaddress features only the street side location is available. For such cases the Y and DisplayY values are equivalent.

Xmin

The minimum x coordinate for the display extent of a feature returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service. The Xmin, Xmax, Ymin, and Ymax values can be combined to set the map extent for displaying a geocode result. The extent coordinates use the WGS84 spatial reference.

Xmax

The maximum x coordinate for the display extent of a feature returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service. The Xmin, Xmax, Ymin, and Ymax values can be combined to set the map extent for displaying a geocode result. The extent coordinates use the WGS84 spatial reference.

Ymin

The minimum y coordinate for the display extent of a feature returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service. The Xmin, Xmax, Ymin, and Ymax values can be combined to set the map extent for displaying a geocode result. The extent coordinates use the WGS84 spatial reference.

Ymax

The maximum y coordinate for the display extent of a feature returned by the ArcGIS World Geocoding Service. The Xmin, Xmax, Ymin, and Ymax values can be combined to set the map extent for displaying a geocode result. The extent coordinates use the WGS84 spatial reference.

ExInfo

A collection of strings from the input that could not be matched to any part of an address.

extent

The minimum bounding rectangle of the output match feature as specified by the xmin, ymin, xmax, and ymax properties. The spatial reference of the x and y coordinates is defined by the spatialReference output field. This is always returned by default for findAddressCandidates geocode requests only.