Set image display properties

Using Map Viewer, you can modify the display of your imagery in your web maps. As the author of a map, you decide how the imagery in the map is presented. You can modify the display settings for dynamic and tiled imagery layers.

When you add an imagery layer to a map, the map initially uses the default display settings of the imagery layer. To change the display settings, you can modify the properties, styles, and processing templates of imagery layers or adjust the image display order of each layer.

The styles for displaying imagery layers depend on the type of raster or imagery data contained in the layer and the source of the layer. Different styling options are called renderers. For example, the Stretch renderer uses the statistics and histograms of pixel values in a single raster band to enhance the display of continuous data. Alternatively, the Classify renderer allows you to group ranges of pixel values into classes and assign colors to the individual classes. See Style imagery in Map Viewer for details on displaying your imagery with an appropriate style.

ArcGIS Online imagery layers sometimes have associated processing templates, called raster function templates. Any number of raster functions can be included in a processing chain and saved as a custom raster function template associated with an image layer. In these cases, you can select from one of the predefined custom processing templates for display. For example, a multispectral imagery layer can be published with a colorized NDVI processing template, which allows you to visualize NDVI data as you roam and zoom the layer.

Use a processing template

Dynamic imagery layers generated from image services are often created with one or more custom processing templates. Processing templates are preset display settings or raster function chains associated with imagery layers. For example, the Seafloor Temperature (°C) imagery layer in ArcGIS Living Atlas is published with a cartographic renderer as well as a renderer that converts Celsius to Fahrenheit, and one that converts Celsius to Kelvin. These are not separate imagery layers; rather, it is one imagery layer that can be displayed with different custom processing templates. You can choose to display the imagery layer with any of the predefined processing templates.

To use a predefined processing template to display an imagery layer, complete the following steps:

  1. Confirm that you are signed in and, if you want to save your changes, that you have privileges to create content.

    Note:
    You can explore maps, add and configure layers, and more without signing in. To save your work, sign in before creating your map.

  2. In Map Viewer, open the map containing the layer or add the layer directly.
  3. On the Settings (light) toolbar, click Processing templates Processing templates.

    The Processing Templates pane appears, listing all the processing templates associated with the image layer.

  4. Choose the predefined processing template to use to render the imagery layer.
  5. Click Done to close the Processing Templates pane.

Configure multidimensional settings

Multidimensional imagery layers can contain many slices of data. Configuring multidimensional settings allows you to visualize a particular slice within a multidimensional imagery layer and specify which slices are displayed in the map.

Only one slice of a multidimensional imagery layer can be displayed at one time. The slice is defined by the variable and dimensions specified in the multidimensional settings. You can change the current display slice by selecting different options from the drop-down menus.

The range of slices available for display in the Current display slice can be limited by modifying the Multidimensional extent.

To change the multidimensional settings for a multidimensional imagery layer, complete the following steps:

  1. Confirm that you are signed in and, if you want to save your changes, that you have privileges to create content.

    Note:
    You can explore maps, add and configure layers, and more without signing in. To save your work, sign in before creating your map.

  2. In Map Viewer, open the map containing the layer or add the layer directly.
  3. On the Settings (light) toolbar, click Multidimensional Multidimensional.

    The Multidimensional settings pane appears.

    Note:
    You can also view information about the multidimensional visualization options and open the multidimensional settings from the Properties pane.

  4. In the Current display slice section, do any of the following:
    • Select a Display variable from the drop-down menu.

      Some multidimensional imagery layers have multiple variables. The display variable indicates which value is being shown in the map. Only one variable can be shown on the map at a time.

    • Select a Time dimension from the drop-down menu.

      Many multidimensional layers contain a time dimension. When the time dimension is used, the range reflects the range of values available in the time dimension.

      Note:

      If your multidimensional data includes other dimensions (Z dimension), they will appear below the time dimension drop-down menu.

  5. Expand the Multidimensional extent section and do any of the following to set the available display slices:
    • Add or remove variables.
    • Set a time range by dragging the handles on the slider or selecting a Start and End time from the drop-down menus. The time range determines the first and last available slices.

    The dimension used to display the multidimensional imagery layer controls the range of values.

    You can choose specific dates to define the range of dimension values as well.

  6. When you are finished configuring multidimensional settings, click Done.

Change the image display order

A dynamic imagery layer of a mosaic dataset contains a collection of images. These images are mosaicked on the fly and behave like a single image when you view the layer. For example, the USA NAIP Imagery: Natural Color imagery layer from ArcGIS Living Atlas is published from a mosaic dataset.

When working with these types of imagery layers in a web map, you can modify the image display order and determine how to resolve overlapping areas. Image order refers to how images are displayed when there are multiple images over the same area.

To change the image display order for a mosaic dataset imagery layer, complete the following steps:

  1. Confirm that you are signed in and, if you want to save your changes, that you have privileges to create content.

    Note:
    You can explore maps, add and configure layers, and more without signing in. To save your work, sign in before creating your map.

  2. In Map Viewer, open the map containing the layer or add the layer directly.
  3. On the Settings (light) toolbar, click Image display order Image display order.
  4. In the Image Display Order pane, specify the Mosaic method you want to use to prioritize imagery. The options are as follows:
    • North West—The order is based on the center of each image's distance to the northwest corner of the mosaicked raster layer. Since this presents a static display, it is useful when you do not want the images to change percentage as you roam across the mosaic.
    • By Attribute—Select an attribute to determine the image display order. The image with the highest priority according to its attribute will be displayed on top. For example, to show the most recent images, you can display the images based on their acquisition dates. Another common attribute to use is the percentage of cloud cover to get the clearest image possible.
    • Closest to Center—The images with their image centers closest in distance to the center of the screen display on top. This is useful if you are interested in viewing features from a more persistent point of view.
    • Closest to Nadir—The images with their image centers closest to a nadir (vertical) view angle display on top. This is useful if you are interested in viewing imagery with a minimum of building and feature lean.
    • Seamlines—Images are prioritized based on the existing seamlines. If you choose this option, use Blend to resolve any overlapping pixels.
    • Lock RasterLocked images will be displayed.
    • None—Order based on ObjectId.
  5. Specify the Mosaic operator for resolving overlapping pixels. The options are as follows:
    • First—Display the pixel value from the image that has the highest priority as set by the mosaic method.
    • Minimum—Display the lowest pixel value.
    • Maximum—Display the highest pixel value.
    • Average—Display the mean pixel value.
    • Blend—Use the blend option for overlapping areas to create a smooth transition along seamlines.
    • Sum—Add all of the pixel values together.
  6. Optionally, reverse the order of priority by turning on the Reverse the order toggle button.
  7. Click Done to close the Image Display Order pane.