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Add assets

In this exercise, you are the GIS administrator for the City of San Diego. You support the fire department by providing geographic data to facilitate its projects, and its upcoming project is inspecting fire hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center. The firefighters need to be able to search for, see, and plan routes to specific fire hydrants to inspect them. To enable the inspections, you need to create a map that they can use in Navigator that contains the fire hydrants and roads.

To provide the map the firefighters need, you'll use ArcGIS Pro. You'll start with the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS network dataset and add the fire hydrant data maintained by your organization. You'll enable searching for fire hydrants, create a custom travel mode for the fire truck, package the data as a mobile map package, and share it with your ArcGIS organization. The firefighters will be able to download the map in Navigator and use it to get to their inspections.

Note:

If you would like to add roads to an Esri-provided navigation map, you need the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads dataset, and should follow either the Add assets and digitize roads exercise or the Add assets and load roads exercise. If you would like to create a map with entirely your own data, see the Make a map with all your own data exercise. For help choosing which exercise to follow, see Decide which exercise to follow.

Requirements

To complete this entire exercise, you need the following products and licenses:

  • ArcGIS Pro 2.3 or later
    Note:

    You can create custom navigation maps with your organization's assets, locators, and roads in ArcGIS Pro 1.2 or later. You need ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later to create your own travel modes and use feature editing templates. Mobile map packages can be created and shared with the Create Mobile Map Package and Share Package tools. ArcGIS Pro 2.2 or later is required to use the Share tab to create and share a mobile map package. ArcGIS Pro 2.3 is required to see the same user interface referenced in this exercise.

  • A mobile device with Navigator for ArcGIS installed
  • An ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for the following:

Your ArcGIS organizational administrator is responsible for configuring these licenses. If you have an ArcGIS organizational account, but need one of these products or licenses, ask your ArcGIS organizational administrator to send an email to services@esri.com. If you don't have an ArcGIS organizational account, sign up for a free trial.

Note:

If you are a member of an organization on ArcGIS Online and need a Navigator for ArcGIS trial license added to it, request a free trial on the ArcGIS Marketplace listing for Navigator.

For this exercise, you will work with a sample dataset from StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS. If you are going to be completing this exercise with your own copy of the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS data, see Get started with StreetMap Premium in ArcGIS Pro before proceeding to the next section.

Additional products and licenses that are needed to complete particular sections of the exercise are noted at the beginnings of those sections.

Open the project in ArcGIS Pro and explore the data

It's important to get an understanding of the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS data before you add fire hydrant data to it. Open the ArcGIS Pro project and familiarize yourself with the data.

  1. Start ArcGIS Pro.
    Note:

    If you don't have it, install ArcGIS Pro.

  2. On the start page, click Open another project Browse.

    The Open Project window appears.

  3. To find the project available for this exercise, you'll search on a portal. Under Portal, click All Portal All Portal.
    Open All Portal
  4. In the Search bar, type Navigator Custom Data Tutorial and press Enter.

    The Navigator for ArcGIS - Custom Data Tutorial project appears.

  5. Click the project and click OK.

    The project opens with some of the necessary components of a navigation map: maps and a transportation network dataset that supports routing.

    The StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS project comes with two maps: Navigation with Custom Streets and Add Custom Streets. The Add Custom Streets map contains the imagery basemap, which makes it easier to digitize and edit your organization's streets. Since you only want to add your organization's assets to the map, you won't use the Add Custom Streets map and will just create a navigation map from the Navigation with Custom Streets map.

    Two maps included in the project

    To see what the Navigation with Custom Streets map contains, review its Contents pane. There is a compressed basemap layer named Navigation Day with Custom Streets. Within the basemap is a transportation network dataset named Routing_ND. This dataset contains rules that affect how routes are generated.

    Note:

    If you'd like to create a navigation map with a night theme, click Basemap Basemap in the Layer group of the Map tab and choose Navigation Night with Custom Streets from the gallery.

    The map does not contain an operational layer of fire hydrants, a way to search for hydrants, or a custom travel mode for fire trucks. At this point, if you were to create a navigation map and share it with the firefighters, they would only see the roads they use to route to hydrants. They would not be able to see, search for, or get directions to specific fire hydrants. You will enable firefighters to perform these actions with your navigation map by following this exercise.

    Note:

    If you are following this exercise with your copy of the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS data, you will notice that it is not clipped to a specific project area, in contrast to the exercise data, which has been clipped to the San Diego area. That's okay, because when you package the data later as a mobile map package, you will have the option to clip to your project extent.

Add an asset layer

Now that you have your project open, and see that the roads are already set up for routing, add the fire hydrant data so firefighters can view, search for, and route to particular hydrants they need to inspect.

  1. While viewing the Navigation with Custom Streets map, on the Map tab, click Add Data Add Data.
    Add Data button
    Note:

    If you are following this exercise with your own data and you are adding an operational layer with a coordinate system that's different from the map's coordinate system, the map's coordinate system will by default change to the coordinate system of the first operational layer that you add. If you would rather choose the map's coordinate system, click the Project tab and click Options. Under Application, click Map and Scene and click Spatial Reference. Click the Choose spatial reference option and choose the coordinate system that is appropriate for your map.

  2. Browse to the fire hydrant data that you want to include on the map. The City of San Diego keeps this data in a layer package that is available in a portal. Under Portal, click All Portal All Portal.
  3. In the Search bar, type Navigator tutorial fire hydrants and press Enter.

    The Navigator for ArcGIS Tutorial - Fire Hydrants layer package appears.

  4. Click the layer package, and then click OK to add it to your map.

    Fire hydrants appear on the map around the San Diego Convention Center as purple points, and the layer appears in the Contents pane. The hydrants also have labels.

    Fire hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center

    By this point you have created a map for the firefighters that contains roads and hydrants. However, the symbology of the map could be more understandable, and you have not yet made the hydrants searchable.

Customize the map symbology and labels

Change the symbology and labels of the hydrants so the firefighters can more easily see and locate them in Navigator. Labels will also help firefighters ensure that they are routing to the correct hydrants.

  1. If the Fire Hydrants layer in the Contents pane is not already highlighted, click it.

    The layer is highlighted. On the ribbon, the Feature Layer contextual tab displays with Appearance, Labeling, and Data tabs.

  2. Click the Appearance tab, and then click Symbology Symbology in the Drawing group.
    Symbology button

    The Symbology pane appears.

  3. In the Symbology pane, click the current symbol.

    The pane changes to show formatting options. You can modify the properties of the current symbol or choose a different symbol from the gallery. In this case, you'll choose a different symbol.

  4. On the maps you make for the fire department, you use a particular red cross symbol to represent fire hydrants. You'll use it again here so that the firefighters find the map familiar. In the Search bar, type Cross 3 and press Enter.

    The Cross 3 symbol appears in the search results.

  5. Click the Cross 3 symbol.

    On the map, the symbol for hydrants changes from a purple point to the Cross 3 symbol.

  6. On the Feature Layer contextual tab, click the Labeling tab.
  7. For this layer, the hydrants are labeled based on the SIZE_NUM field by default. When heading to an inspection, the firefighters do not identify hydrants based on this information. Rather, they locate hydrants based on their IDs. In the Label Class group, set Field to HYD_ID so that the labels display information that is useful to the firefighters.
    Set Label Class Field

    If you're not seeing the labels appear, make sure that Enable Labeling Enable Labeling, highlighted in blue in the above image, is on.

    Hydrants are now easier to identify because they are labeled by their IDs on the map. The labels will also help firefighters verify that they are generating routes to the correct hydrants in Navigator.

  8. In the Text Symbol group, set the label size to 11.
    Label size
  9. In the Text Symbol group, click the Text Symbol dialog box launcher Launcher.

    The Label Class pane appears.

  10. Click Halo and click the drop-down arrow next to Halo symbol. Under Polygon symbols, select White fill and click Apply.
    Apply label halo

    A thin white halo is created around the hydrant labels, making them easier to read over the basemap.

    You now have a map similar to the one shown below with symbology that's familiar and clear to the firefighters. Now they can use the map to view the hydrants they need to route to and the roads they will use for routing. Next you will make the hydrants searchable.

    Note:

    If you are using your own data to complete this exercise and you want to edit its symbology, make sure the symbols are approximately the same size as the symbols in this project. This will ensure that the symbols appear clearly on the map after your mobile workers download it in Navigator.

    Newly symbolized fire hydrants
  11. Click Save Project Save.

Enable searching for assets

Since firefighters identify hydrants they need to inspect by their IDs, enable searching for fire hydrants by ID in Navigator by configuring an asset layer to search on a specific field. Enabling search by ID using the Locate pane allows firefighters to quickly find their destinations.

  1. On the Map tab, in the Inquiry group, click Locate Locate.
    Locate button

    The Locate pane appears.

  2. Click Settings.

    The Locate pane displays a list of available locate providers.

  3. Click Add Add, and click Add Layer to add a layer from your map to the Locate pane.
    Add Locate Provider
  4. Select the Fire Hydrants layer and click OK.

    The Locate pane displays the Configure Layer for Locate view for the Fire Hydrants layer.

  5. Since you want to enable searching by the hydrant's ID, click the drop-down arrow next to HYD_ID in the Search Mode column and select Contains.
    Configure Layer for Locate pane

    HYD_ID is the field the locator will use to find a feature. In this case, you are adding a locate provider that will search for hydrants by their IDs.

  6. Click the Save and return to Settings button Save and return to Settings to exit the Configure Layer for Locate view.

    The Fire Hydrants layer is added to the list of locate providers in the Locate pane.

  7. Click Fire Hydrants in the list of locate providers and drag it to the top of the list.

    Fire hydrants are listed first in the Locate search results.

Tip:

Unlike creating a custom address locator, adding an asset layer as a locate provider doesn't add to your .mmpk file's size. However, suggestions are not displayed in Navigator when an asset layer is added as a locate provider. If you want to enable suggestions for asset searching in Navigator, you need to create a custom address locator using the Create Address Locator tool. For this exercise, the Create Address Locator pane should match the image shown below.

Completed Create Address Locator pane

Test asset searching

Before sharing the map with the firefighters, test whether search is working properly by searching for a specific fire hydrant.

  1. In ArcGIS Pro, you can run a search by using the Locate tool. If the Locate pane is not already open, on the Map tab, in the Inquiry group, click Locate Locate.
  2. Click the Locate tab. In the Search bar, type the ID of a hydrant on the map that you would like to locate. For example, type the ID SDH8606 and press Enter.

    The map zooms to the hydrant that you searched for, and the hydrant appears in the search results in the Locate pane. You have successfully enabled searching for assets.

Add a general address locator to the project

In addition to searching for fire hydrants, firefighters might want to search based on street addresses or intersections. To enable these types of searches in Navigator, add the general USA address locator to the project. This locator comes with StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS. It's not required to add this locator to the project.

  1. If the Catalog pane is not visible, click the View tab and click Catalog Pane Catalog Pane.
  2. Under Folders > Navigator_for_ArcGIS_-_Custom_Data_Tutorial > p14 > Loc, find USA.loc.
  3. Right-click the locator and click Add To Project.
    Tip:

    To make sure that you've successfully added the USA locator to the project, click the arrow next to the Locators folder. The USA locator should appear in the list of locators.

Create your own travel mode

Since your firefighters will be traveling to inspections in their fire truck, they need directions that avoid low bridges so their trucks don't get stuck underneath them. Create a travel mode with a specific height restriction that your firefighters will choose in Navigator. This travel mode will provide them with routes that avoid roads with low bridges to prevent accidents and increase driver safety.

Note:

ArcGIS Network Analyst extension is required to complete this section of the exercise.

  1. In the Contents pane, right-click the Routing_ND layer within the Navigation Day with Custom Streets basemap, and click Properties Properties.
  2. On the lower left of the dialog box, click Travel Modes.

    You see details about the Driving Time travel mode, which comes with Navigator.

  3. Click the menu Menu in the upper right, and click New New.

    Fields for your new travel mode appear on the dialog box.

  4. The first field is for the name of your new travel mode. Replace the default name New Travel Mode with Fire Truck Height Restriction so the firefighters know the purpose of this travel mode.
    Tip:

    If you need to rename your travel mode, click the menu Menu and choose Rename or press F2.

  5. In the Description field, type Use this travel mode to avoid roads with low bridges while driving a fire truck.

    The description provides firefighters with more details about this travel mode.

  6. In the Type field, choose Trucking, since your workers will be traveling by truck.
  7. Under Costs, in the Distance Cost field, change the units from Miles to Kilometers, since all parameter values are in terms of the metric system for StreetMap Premium. Units must be used consistently for mobile workers to use your travel mode in Navigator.
  8. Click Restrictions to expand this section.

    A list of travel mode attributes and parameter values appears. The attributes you see depend on the attributes of your network dataset.

  9. Scroll down until you see the Height Restriction attribute. Check the box next to it.

    Two parameters appear under the attribute: Restriction Usage and Vehicle Height (meters).

  10. Ensure that the value for Restriction Usage is Prohibited, since you never want firefighters to travel on a road with a bridge that is lower than the truck.
  11. In the Vehicle Height (meters) field, type 4.9, because the fire trucks are 4.9 meters tall.
  12. Set your new travel mode as the default travel mode for the map. Click the menu Menu and click Set as Default Set as Default.

    Setting your new travel mode as the default travel mode ensures that all firefighters using your map package in Navigator will use the Fire Truck Height Restriction travel mode by default.

  13. Click OK.

    You have created a custom travel mode that allows your drivers to avoid roads with low bridges.

Test your travel mode

Before packaging the map, test whether your travel mode is working correctly by creating stops on either side of a bridge that's lower than the fire truck and seeing if the route avoids the bridge.

Note:

ArcGIS Network Analyst extension is required to complete this section of the exercise.

  1. In the Locate pane, in the Search bar, type the ID SDH8789 and press Enter.

    The map zooms to the hydrant that you searched for. Slightly zoom out until you see the hydrant labeled SDH24679, west of SDH8789, on the other side of an overpass and three bridges symbolized by thick yellow lines. These bridges have a clearance of about 4.6 meters where they cross C Street, which is too low for the 4.9-meter-tall fire truck.

    To see if your travel mode avoids traveling under the bridges on C Street, in the following steps, you will create stops on top of both of these hydrants and run network analysis using the Driving Time travel mode and your travel mode. The route produced with the Driving Time travel mode should involve traveling under the bridges on C Street, but the route produced with the Fire Truck Height Restriction travel mode should not.

  2. On the Analysis tab, in the Tools group, click Network Analysis and click Route Route.
    Tip:

    In the Network Analysis drop-down menu, under Network Data Source, make sure that Routing_ND appears. This is the network dataset that you want to test. If it doesn't appear, click Change Network Data Source, click Routing_ND, and then click OK.

    In the Contents pane, a Route layer appears. This is the layer you will use to add stops to your route.

  3. On the Edit tab, in the Features group, click Create Create Features.
  4. In the Create Features pane, search for stops and click this in the results.
  5. Create one stop by clicking the SDH24679 hydrant and another stop by clicking the SDH8789 hydrant.
  6. On the Route tab, in the Travel Settings group, make sure that the Mode field is set to Driving Time.
  7. In the Analysis group, click Run Run.

    A route is generated between the two stops that involves traveling under the bridges on C Street, as expected, since this travel mode doesn't have any height restrictions.

    Route generated with the Driving Time travel mode
  8. In the Travel Settings group, set the Mode field to Fire Truck Height Restriction and click Run Run again.

    A route is generated that doesn't involve traveling under the bridges on C Street, as desired. Rather, the route involves traveling under the overpass on Broadway, where the clearance is tall enough for the fire truck.

    Route generated with the Fire Truck Height Restriction travel mode

    You have successfully created a custom travel mode that allows your drivers to avoid roads with bridges that are lower than the fire truck. When you package your navigation map as a mobile map package in the next section, your custom travel mode will be included, so your mobile workers can access it in Navigator.

  9. Since these stops were only created for testing purposes, in the Contents pane, right-click the Route layer, click Remove Remove, and click Discard.

Package and share the data

You now have fire hydrants, roads, searchable assets, a general address locator, and a custom travel mode ready for your firefighters. Combine all of these components into one file that you can share with firefighters for offline use in Navigator. After you share the mobile map package with firefighters, they will download it to their device, just like any other map in Navigator.

Note:

ArcGIS Network Analyst extension is required to complete this section of the exercise.

Tip:

If you need to make multiple similar mobile map packages, automate the process with Python using the Create Mobile Map Package and Share Package geoprocessing tools. Be sure to use the same settings for creating and sharing the package as indicated in this section.

Note that mobile workers will search for the package using the name provided in the Output File field, and after they download it, the name will change to the one provided in the Title field.

  1. On the Share tab, in the Package group, click Mobile Map New Mobile Map Package.

    The Package Mobile Map pane appears.

  2. Under Start Packaging, select Upload package to Online account.
  3. In the Name field, specify a name for the package that firefighters will search for in Navigator.
  4. The Summary and Tags fields automatically fill in with default text. Editing these fields is optional.
  5. Zoom to your desired map extent.
  6. Under Options, select Current Display Extent.
  7. If you would like the package in Navigator to match the current extent in ArcGIS Pro, check the Clip check box.

    When Clip is checked, the features are clipped to match the extent of the display. If Clip is not checked, the display extent is used to select all features that intersect the display.

  8. If you chose to include the USA locator, check the Include Locator check box, and then click the drop-down arrow and select the USA locator.
    Include Locator check box
    Note:

    If you created the locator in this session, it appears in the drop-down menu. If you created it in another ArcGIS Pro session, click browse Browse.

    If you included more than one locator, a composite locator will be created when you click Package.

  9. Use the Folder menu to specify where the package will be stored in your portal content. The package is stored in the root of your content by default. Optionally click browse Browse to create a folder or choose an existing one. You can also type the name of the desired folder in the text box.
  10. Check the box next to the name of your organization to share the package within your organization.
    Tip:

    If you decide to share the package with specific groups in your organization, make sure that your mobile workers belong to those groups.

  11. Click Analyze to check for any errors or issues. You must resolve all errors. If any issues are discovered, they appear on the Messages tab. Right-click each message to get more information, read the help for the error or warning, and access suggested fixes.

    The analysis completes with the following warning: 24069 Live traffic is not supported when publishing to runtime. This means that live traffic is only supported when the data is published as a service. You are creating this mobile map package for use in Navigator, which works in disconnected environments and does not use services, so you can ignore this warning.

  12. Click Package to create your mobile map package.
    Note:

    It may take some time for the Package Mobile Map tool to run.

    A message appears, indicating that the mobile map package was created successfully. The package is now shared with your organization. Members can sign in to Navigator, search for the package, and download it to their device to use offline.

Test the map in Navigator

In Navigator, test your map to ensure that firefighters can see, search for, and route to fire hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center. Below are some key things to test for. For more details, see Quick reference and Route in Navigator.

Note:

You need an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for Navigator for ArcGIS to test your map. You also need a mobile device with Navigator for ArcGIS installed.

  1. Find, download, and open your map.
    You see the map of hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center that you created in ArcGIS Pro. You might get the message Cannot go to location. Your location is outside the extent of the map. That's fine—Navigator is just trying to use your GPS location as your start point, but you'll specify a start point within the map extent later, so tap OK to dismiss this.
  2. Test whether you can search Places for a particular hydrant by its ID, such as SDH8789.
    Tip:

    You will not see search suggestions. If you require search suggestions, create a custom address locator instead of configuring an asset layer to search on a specific field.

  3. Generate a route to this hydrant to see if firefighters can generate directions to hydrants. If you are not physically located within the map extent, you will need to simulate your starting location as follows:
    • On Android devices—Tap Back Back, tap Profile Profile, and tap your user name three times. Tap Developer and tap Simulate location. Once the map loads, zoom in and tap a location on the map to use as your starting point. Tap Done Done, tap Back Back, and close your profile. Tap your current map, tap the search result you generated previously, and tap Directions.

      To clear the location simulation settings, exit and restart the app, tap Profile Profile, and tap your user name three times to close the Developer settings.

    • On an iPhone or an iPad—Tap Maps, tap Profile Profile, and tap your user name three times. Under Advanced Settings, tap Simulation & Logging and tap Choose Location. Once the map loads, zoom in and tap a location on the map to use as your starting point. Tap Use, tap Profile Profile, and tap Done. Tap your current map, tap the search result you generated previously, and tap Directions.

      To clear the location simulation settings, exit and restart the app, tap Profile Profile, and tap your user name three times to close Advanced Settings.

  4. Choose the travel mode you created to see if firefighters can generate directions to hydrants that don't involve traveling on roads with low bridges.
    Note:

    Your travel mode will appear under Custom in the list of other travel modes that come with Navigator. This experience is slightly different than that of choosing a travel mode when you have not created your own.

You have added fire hydrants to the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS network dataset and enabled firefighters to search for these hydrants. You also created a custom travel mode that firefighters can use to receive the best routes when traveling in their fire truck. You then packaged all of the data as a mobile map package and shared it with the firefighters. Now they can open the map in Navigator and see, search for, and route to fire hydrants offline in their truck.