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Add assets and digitize roads

In this exercise, you are the GIS administrator for an electric utility company in San Diego. The company needs to do maintenance work on power line supports throughout the area. Specifically, utility workers need to be able to search for, see, and route to particular supports to perform maintenance work on them. They also need to be able to route on the utility's private and unpaved roads that lead to the supports. To facilitate the maintenance work, you need to create a map that the utility workers can use in Navigator that contains the power line supports, the utility's roads, and a custom travel mode that incorporates unpaved roads when they are part of the best route.

To provide the map the utility workers need, you'll use ArcGIS Pro. You'll start with the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads network dataset and add power line support data as well as digitize the private roads that lead to these supports. You'll also enable searching for supports, create a custom travel mode that incorporates unpaved roads when they are part of the best route, package the data as a mobile map package, and share it with your ArcGIS organization. The utility workers will be able to download the map in Navigator and use it to get to their maintenance jobs.

Note:

If you have already created roads and are considering adding those to the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads dataset, see the Add assets and load roads exercise. If you want to only add your organization's assets to the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro dataset, see the Add assets exercise. If you would like to create a map with entirely your own data, see the Make a map with all your own data exercise. For help choosing which exercise to follow, see Decide which exercise to follow.

Requirements

To complete this entire exercise, you need the following products and licenses:

  • ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later
    Note:

    You can create custom navigation maps with your organization's assets, locators, and roads in ArcGIS Pro 1.2 or later. However, you need ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later to create your own travel modes, use feature editing templates, and see the same user interface referenced in this exercise.

  • A mobile device with Navigator for ArcGIS installed
  • An ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for the following:

Your ArcGIS organizational administrator is responsible for configuring these licenses. If you have an ArcGIS organizational account, but need one of these products or licenses, ask your ArcGIS organizational administrator to send an email to services@esri.com. If you don't have an ArcGIS organizational account, sign up for a free trial.

Note:

If you are a member of an organization on ArcGIS Online but need a Navigator for ArcGIS trial license added to it, request a free trial on the ArcGIS Marketplace listing for Navigator.

For this exercise, you will work with a sample dataset from StreetMap Premium Custom Roads. If you want to complete this exercise with your own copy of StreetMap Premium Custom Roads, first see the Quick-Start Guide that comes with your purchase before proceeding to the next section.

The products and licenses that are needed to complete particular sections of the exercise are noted at the beginnings of sections.

Open the project in ArcGIS Pro and explore the data

It's important to get an understanding of the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads data before you add power line supports and private roads to it. Open the ArcGIS Pro project and familiarize yourself with the data.

Note:

To complete this exercise section, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. Start ArcGIS Pro.
    Note:

    If you don't have it, install ArcGIS Pro .

  2. On the start page, click Open an existing project or Open another project Browse.
  3. To find the project available for this exercise, you'll search on a portal. Under Open, click Portal.
    Portal button in Project pane
  4. Click Browse Browse and then click All Portal All Portal.
  5. In the Search bar, type Navigator Custom Data Tutorial and press Enter.

    The Navigator for ArcGIS - Custom Data Tutorial project appears.

  6. Click the project and click OK.

    The project opens with some of the necessary components of a navigation map: maps and a transportation network dataset that supports routing.

    The StreetMap Premium Custom Roads project comes with two maps: Navigation with Custom Streets and Add Custom Streets. You will create a navigation map from the Navigation with Custom Streets map.

    Two maps included in the project

    To see what the Navigation with Custom Streets map contains, review its Contents pane. There is a compressed basemap layer named Navigation Day with Custom Streets. Within the basemap is a transportation network dataset named Routing_ND. This dataset contains rules that affect how routes are generated.

    Note:

    If you'd like to create a navigation map with a night theme, click Basemap Basemap in the Layer group of the Map tab and choose Navigation Night with Custom Streets from the gallery.

    The map does not contain an operational layer of power line supports, a geocoding locator to search for these, your company's private roads, or a custom travel mode that incorporates unpaved roads when they are part of the best route. At this point, if you were to create a navigation map and share it with the utility workers, they would only see the public roads they will use to route to the power line supports. They would not be able to see, search for, or route to specific power line supports using your organization's private and unpaved roads. You will enable utility workers to perform these actions with your navigation map by following this exercise.

    To include your organization's private roads on the Navigation with Custom Streets map, you will create them in the Add Custom Streets map. Roads that you digitize in the Add Custom Streets map appear on the Navigation with Custom Streets map. You will use the Add Custom Streets map to digitize roads because it contains the World Imagery basemap, which has images of roads that are a helpful reference when adding roads.

    The Add Custom Streets map also contains the Routing_ND transportation network dataset that appears on the Navigation Day with Custom Streets basemap. The Routing_ND transportation network dataset is composed of three layers: Custom Streets Override, Custom Streets, and Routing Streets.

    The Routing Streets layer is the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads dataset that you will add your organization's roads to. Your organization's roads are symbolized by the Custom Streets feature class. Custom Streets Override points are needed to connect the Routing Streets and Custom Streets feature classes; however, in this exercise you will use feature editing templates that will automatically create these points for you.

    Note:

    If you are following this exercise with your copy of the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads data, you will notice that it is not clipped to a specific project area, in contrast to the exercise data, which has been clipped to the San Diego area. That's okay, because when you package the data later using the Create Mobile Map Package tool, you will have the option to clip to your project extent.

Add an asset layer

Now that you have your project open and are familiar with the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads data, add the power line support data to it so that utility workers can view, search for, and route to particular supports they need to perform maintenance work on.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. While viewing the Navigation with Custom Streets map, on the Map tab, click Add Data Add Data.
    Add Data button
    Note:

    If you are following this exercise with your own data and you are adding an operational layer with a coordinate system that's different from the map's coordinate system, the map's coordinate system will by default change to the coordinate system of the first operational layer that you add. If you would rather choose the map's coordinate system, click the Project tab and click Options. Under Application, click Map and Scene and click Spatial Reference. Click the Choose spatial reference option and choose the coordinate system that is appropriate for your map.

  2. Browse to the power line support data that you want to include on the map. Your company keeps this data in a layer package that is available in a portal. Under Portal, click All Portal All Portal.
  3. In the Search bar, type Navigator tutorial power line supports and press Enter.

    The Navigator for ArcGIS Tutorial - Power Line Supports layer package appears.

  4. Click the layer package and click OK.

    Power line supports appear on the map and the Power Line Supports layer appears in the Contents pane.

  5. On the Map tab, click Bookmarks Create Bookmark, and then click the Miguel Substation bookmark.

    The map zooms in to an area with several power line supports. There do not appear to be any roads leading to them. In the next section, you will add roads to the map that lead to these supports so mobile workers can route to them.

    Power line supports on the Navigation with Custom Streets map

Create roads

It would be difficult to add roads to the power line supports on the Navigation with Custom Streets map because it doesn't contain imagery that can be used as a reference. The Add Custom Streets map does, though. In this section, you will create streets on the Add Custom Streets map that will also appear on the Navigation with Custom Streets map.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst.

  1. Click the Add Custom Streets map tab.
  2. Add the Navigator for ArcGIS Tutorial - Power Line Supports layer package to the map so you can see the locations of the supports. See steps 1–4 in the previous section, Add an asset layer, for details.
  3. On the Map tab, click Bookmarks Create Bookmark, and then click the Miguel Substation bookmark.

    The map zooms in to the area where you need to digitize streets. If you pan away from this area, you can easily return to it by clicking the Miguel Substation bookmark again.

    Since the Add Custom Streets map contains the World Imagery basemap, you can see that there are some roads leading to the power line supports that have not been digitized yet. Using the imagery as a guide, you will add some routable roads to the map by completing the following steps.

  4. Zoom in to the map more, until the black labels next to the supports appear. In the next two steps, you will set the color of the labels to white so they stand out against the imagery, and it's easier to locate specific supports that you need to digitize roads to.
  5. On the Feature Layer contextual tab, click the Labeling tab.
  6. In the Text Symbol group, set the color of the labels to white.
    Note:

    If you are using your own data to complete this exercise, make sure that the label expression for the label classes in your operational layers is set to VBScript. By default, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later uses Arcade label expressions; however, Navigator does not support these. To change the label expressions for your operational layers, click Expression Label expression in the Label Class group of the Labeling tab. In the Label Class pane, set the Language field to VBScript and click Apply.

  7. Zoom in to the area northwest of the substations where the road to the substations intersects with a road in the Routing Streets layer, labeled 1 in the image below.
    Overview of custom routes

    This will be the starting point of a paved custom road. In the following steps, you will make a paved custom road from this point to the MIGUEL00037 power line support labeled 3 below, following the paved road in the imagery that splits off to the left at the fork. You will also make a paved custom road from the fork to the point labeled 2 below, following the paved road in the imagery that splits off to the right. Finally, you will make an unpaved custom road from the point labeled 2 to point 3, following the unpaved road in the imagery that runs alongside Miguel Substation West. You will make multiple custom roads to the same power line support so that you can test your custom travel mode later in the exercise. To digitize these roads, you will use feature editing templates available in ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later that make it easier to connect streets. When you use these templates, the feature geometry that's necessary to connect streets to each other based on the network dataset rules is automatically added to the map.

  8. Click the Edit tab and click Create Create Features.
  9. In the Create Features pane, under Custom Streets, click the Connect Custom Street to Routing Street feature editing template.

    Predefined attributes for this template appear.

  10. In the STREET_NAME field, type Miguel Substation E. St and press Enter.
  11. Since you need to make the paved road from point 1 to point 3 first, ensure that the PAVED field is set to Y.
    Tip:

    If you would like to edit optional attributes, click Forward Forward in the upper right corner of the Create Features pane to open the Active Template pane. These attributes determine how a route is calculated. For this exercise you will not change any of these, but if you would like more information about attributes, see Understanding network attributes. To return to the Create Features pane, click Back Back.

  12. Click the point where the road to the substations intersects with the road in the Routing Streets layer (which is labeled 1 in the image in step 7 of this section).

    Make sure you have snapped to the Routing Streets layer.

    If snapping is enabled, when you hover over the line a ScreenTip displays textual information about the snap mode and the name of the layer to which it is snapping. If snapping is not enabled, nothing will happen when you hover your pointer over the line. Snapping is enabled by default, but if it's not enabled you can change this by clicking Snapping on the Edit tab. A tool is enabled when it's highlighted blue. To see which type of snapping is enabled, click the arrow. Ensure that Point, End, Vertex, and Edge snapping are enabled. Your snapping menu should match the example below.

    Snapping menu
  13. Create vertices that follow the road in the imagery that splits off to the left, until you snap to the power line support. When you are done, right-click your last vertex and click Finish Finish.
  14. Click Clear Clear Selected.

    Your custom street should look similar to the street shown below. A Custom Streets Override point automatically appears on top of the first vertex of your paved custom street, where it intersects with the Routing Street layer. To connect a custom street and routing street, there needs to be a vertex and custom streets override point where they intersect. This is because of the connectivity policies of the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads network dataset. See Understanding connectivity for more information. This is an example of the feature editing template automatically adding this feature geometry for you, saving you time and effort.

    Paved custom street to the power line support MIGUEL00037
  15. In the Create Features pane, under Custom Streets, click the Connect Custom Street to Custom Street feature editing template.
  16. In the STREET_NAME field, type Miguel Substation St. and press Enter.
  17. Since you will make the second paved road from the fork to point 2, ensure that the PAVED field is set to Y.
  18. Create the first vertex of this paved street by snapping to the first paved street at the fork, and create vertices that follow the road in the imagery that splits off to the right until you reach point 2. Then, right-click and click Finish Finish.
  19. Click Clear Clear Selected.

    Your custom streets should look similar to the streets shown below. At the fork, Miguel Substation E. St has been automatically split in two, so that all the custom roads are snapped to each other at their endpoints. This is how custom roads connect to each other, based on another connectivity rule defined by the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads network dataset. It is also another example of feature editing templates automatically adding in feature geometry for you.

    Two paved custom streets
  20. In the Create Features pane, click the Connect Custom Street to Custom Street feature editing template, type Miguel Substation St. in the STREET_NAME field again, and press Enter.
  21. Since the custom street from point 2 to 3 is unpaved, set the PAVED field to N and press Enter.
  22. Snap to the endpoint of the paved custom street you just made, and create vertices that follow the unpaved road in the imagery that runs along Miguel Substation West, and leads to the MIGUEL00037 power line support. Then, right-click and click Finish Finish.
  23. Click Clear Clear Selected.

    Your custom streets should look similar to the streets shown below. No feature geometry was added at the point where the paved and unpaved custom streets intersect, because they are already connected at their endpoints.

    Unpaved custom street
  24. On the Edit tab, click Save Save Edits and click Yes.

Build the new road network

The custom streets you just created aren't actually part of the network dataset and won't be used in routes until you rebuild the network dataset. You will rebuild it in the following steps.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst.

  1. Click the Analysis tab and click Tools Toolbox.
  2. In the Geoprocessing pane, type Build Network and click the Build Network tool in the search results.
  3. In the Input Network Dataset field, click the drop-down arrow and choose Routing_ND.
  4. Click Run Run.
    You receive a message that the Build Network tool completed successfully. Your copy of the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads dataset now includes the custom streets you just created.

Test the new road network

Test the road network you just built by adding stops to it. If you can generate directions between stops on your organization's roads and public roads, then you have successfully connected your organization's roads to the network.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst.

  1. On the Analysis tab, click Network Analysis and click Route Route.
    Tip:

    In the Network Analysis drop-down menu, under Network Data Source, make sure that Routing_ND appears. This is the network dataset that you want to test. If it doesn't appear, click Change Network Data Source, click Routing_ND, and then click OK.

    In the Contents pane, a Route layer appears. This is the layer you will use to add stops to the road network.

  2. Click the Edit tab and click Create Create Features.
  3. In the Create Features pane, search for stops and click this in the results.
  4. Snap at least one stop to a street from the Routing Streets feature class, each of the paved streets from the Custom Streets feature class, and the unpaved street from the Custom Streets feature class, so that you can test whether all of the various types of streets are connected to each other.
  5. On the Network Analyst contextual tab, click the Route tab and click Run Run.

    A route is generated between the stops that you added and is displayed on the map, which means that you have properly connected the roads.

    Tip:

    If a route was not generated, try building the road network again.

  6. On the Route tab, click Directions Directions.

    Turn-by-turn directions between the stops appear in the Directions pane. If you hover your mouse over a pin in the directions, a red dot appears on the respective stop on the map. By hovering your mouse over all of the pins, you can make sure that the order of the stops in the directions is correct, and you have a functioning network dataset that can be used in Navigator.

    Note:

    The stops that you have created may be referred to as <Null> in the directions. That's okay, as long as directions have been generated between these stops.

  7. Since these stops were only created for testing purposes, in the Contents pane, right-click the Route layer, click Remove Remove, and click Discard.

Create a locator to search for assets

Since the utility workers identify power line supports they need to perform maintenance on by their IDs, enable searching for supports by ID in Navigator by creating a custom address locator. Enabling search by ID using the Create Address Locator tool allows utility workers to quickly find their destinations.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. Click the Navigation with Custom Streets map tab.

    The streets you created in the Add Custom Streets map appear on the Navigation with Custom Streets map.

    Newly created custom roads in Navigation with Custom Streets map
  2. In the Contents pane, select the Power Line Supports layer.
  3. On the Analysis tab, in the Geoprocessing group, click Tools Toolbox.
    Tools button

    The Geoprocessing pane appears.

  4. In the Geoprocessing pane, type Create Address Locator and click this tool in the search results.
    Note:

    In the search results, you might see the Create Composite Address Locator tool. You can use this tool to create a composite locator, but the Create Mobile Map Package tool that you will use later in the exercise also creates composite locators.

  5. In the Create Address Locator pane, for Address Locator Style, choose General - Gazetteer from the drop-down menu.

    The locator style is the template for a locator. The General - Gazetteer locator style is meant to find geographic place-names or landmarks in an area or the world. For this exercise you could also use the General - Single Field locator style, which is used to find features that are identified by a name or code. See Commonly used address locator styles in the ArcGIS Pro help for information about the various types of locator styles and the purposes of each.

  6. For Reference Data, choose Power Line Supports.

    The reference data is what the locator will search through to find a specific feature. In this case, the locator will search the Power Line Supports layer for a support. See Define the locator components for more information.

  7. For Place Name, choose ID.

    Place Name is the type of attribute the locator uses to find a feature. In this case, the locator will search for power line supports by their IDs.

  8. In the Output Address Locator field, edit the name and file location for the address locator if you'd like it to be created in a different location.
  9. Check Enable suggestions.

    This causes suggestions to appear as mobile workers search for an asset in Navigator. At this point the values in the fields of the Create Address Locator pane should match those shown below.

    Completed Create Address Locator pane
  10. Click Run Run.
    You receive a message that the Create Address Locator tool completed successfully. The utility workers can now search for power line supports by ID.

Test asset searching

Before sharing the map with utility workers, test whether search is working properly by searching for a specific power line support.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. In ArcGIS Pro, you can run a search by using the Locate tool. On the Map tab, in the Inquiry group, click Locate Locate.
    Locate button

    The Locate pane opens.

  2. In the Search bar, type the ID of a power line support on the map that you would like to locate. For example, type the ID MIGUEL00037, and press Enter.

    The map zooms in to the support that you searched for, and the support appears in the search results in the Locate pane. Your address locator works.

    Note:

    Even though you have enabled suggestions, these will not appear when you are searching for an asset in ArcGIS Pro unless you publish the locator to ArcGIS Server. However, suggestions will appear when using the locator to search in Navigator.

Add a general address locator to the project

In addition to searching for power line supports, utility workers might want to search based on street addresses or intersections. To enable these types of searches in Navigator, add the general USA address locator to the project. This locator comes with StreetMap Premium Custom Roads. It's not required to add this locator to the project.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. If the Project pane is not visible, click the View tab and click Project Project Pane.
  2. Under Folders > Navigator_for_ArcGIS_-_Custom_Data_Tutorial > p14, find USA.loc.
  3. Right-click the locator and click Add To Project.
    Tip:

    To make sure that you've successfully added the USA locator to the project, click the arrow next to the Locators folder. The USA locator should appear in the list of locators.

Create your own travel mode

Since your utility workers travel to certain inspections using unpaved roads, they need directions that incorporate these roads. By default, the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads network dataset generates directions that avoid unpaved roads whenever possible, since most users prefer paved roads. Create a travel mode that your workers will choose in Navigator and provide them with routes that include unpaved roads when they are part of the best route.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst.

  1. In the Contents pane, right-click the Routing_ND layer within the Navigation Day with Custom Streets basemap, and click Properties Properties.
  2. On the lower left of the dialog box, click Travel Modes.

    You see details about the Driving Time travel mode, which comes with Navigator.

  3. Click the menu Menu in the upper right, and click New New.

    Fields for your new travel mode appear on the dialog box.

  4. The first field is for the name of your new travel mode. Replace the default name New Travel Mode with Use unpaved roads so that the utility workers know the purpose of this travel mode.
  5. In the Description field, enter Use this travel mode to use unpaved roads in routes when they are part of the best route, even if an alternate, paved route can be found. to provide the utility workers with more details about this travel mode.
  6. In the Type field, choose Trucking, since your workers will be traveling by truck.
  7. Click Costs to expand this section.
  8. In the Distance Attribute field, change the units from Miles to Kilometers, since all parameter values are in terms of the metric system for StreetMap Premium Custom Roads, and for mobile workers to use your travel mode in Navigator, units must be used consistently.
  9. Click Restrictions and Parameters to expand this section.

    A list of travel mode attributes and parameter values appears. Which attributes you see depends on the attributes of your network dataset.

  10. Scroll down until you see the Avoid Unpaved Roads attribute, and click it.

    The Restriction Usage parameter appears under the attribute.

  11. Change the value for Restriction Usage to Avoid (low), since you want the utility workers to take a paved road if one is available and it doesn't take them significantly longer to travel to a power line support, and you also want workers to use unpaved roads if those would get them to where they need to be much faster.
  12. Click OK.

    You have created a custom travel mode that incorporates unpaved roads when they are part of the best route.

Test your travel mode

Before packaging the map, test whether your travel mode is working correctly by creating two stops that can be traveled to by either a paved road or a slightly shorter unpaved road. If the Driving Time travel mode, which highly avoids unpaved roads, produces a route to the stop that doesn't include the slightly shorter unpaved road, and your travel mode does, your travel mode works.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst.

  1. On the Navigation with Custom Streets map, snap one stop to the intersection of the paved and unpaved custom streets, and one stop to the MIGUEL00037 power line support. See steps 1–3 in the Test the new road network section for details.
  2. On the Route tab, in the Travel Settings group, make sure that the Mode field is set to Driving Time.
  3. In the Analysis group, click Run Run.

    A route is generated between the two stops that involves traveling on the paved road, even though this route is longer than taking the unpaved road, since this travel mode highly avoids unpaved roads. This is expected.

    Route generated with the Driving Time travel mode
  4. In the Travel Settings group, for the Mode field, choose Use unpaved roads and click Run Run.

    A route is generated that involves traveling on the unpaved road, since it's shorter than taking the paved road, and this travel mode uses unpaved roads. This is also expected.

    Route generated with the Use Unpaved Roads travel mode

    You have successfully created a custom travel mode that incorporates unpaved roads when they are part of the best route. When you package your navigation map using the Create Mobile Map Package geoprocessing tool in the next section, your custom travel mode will be included, so your mobile workers can access it in Navigator.

  5. Since these stops were only created for testing purposes, in the Contents pane, right-click the Route layer, click Remove Remove, and click Discard.

Package the data

You now have all the necessary components of your navigation map for the utility workers: power line supports, private roads, locators, and a custom travel mode. With the Create Mobile Map Package geoprocessing tool, combine all of these components into one file that you can share with utility workers to use offline in Navigator. After you share the mobile map package with utility workers, they will download it to their device, just like any other map in Navigator.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst.

  1. In the Geoprocessing pane, click the menu Menu and click Open Another Tool.
    Open Another Tool
  2. Type Create Mobile Map Package and click this tool in the search results.

    The Create Mobile Map Package pane opens. By default, the current map is used as the Input Map. If you are using the exercise data, you will not change this, but in a production environment you can add multiple maps and basemaps into the package.

  3. In the Output File field, specify an output location and name for the package that utility workers will search for in Navigator.
    Note:

    Utility workers search for the package based on the name provided in the Output File field; however, after they download the package, its name changes to the name provided in the Title field in the Create Mobile Map Package pane.

  4. In the Input Locator field, click the drop-down arrow to select the power line support locator.
    Note:

    Since you created this locator in this session, it appears first in the drop-down menu. If you created it in another ArcGIS Pro session, you have to browse for it.

  5. In the second Input Locator field, choose the USA locator.

    Later, when you click Run Run, you will create a composite locator that enables mobile workers to search for places along with your organization's assets.

  6. Zoom to your desired map extent.
  7. Set Extent to Current Display Extent.
    Current Display Extent changes to As Specified Below in the drop-down menu, and the minimum and maximum values of the extent appear.
  8. If you would like the package in Navigator to match the current extent in ArcGIS Pro, check Clip Features. Everything on the map that is outside the current extent will be clipped. This minimizes the package size, making it faster and easier to share.
  9. If you would like to, edit the remaining fields in the Create Mobile Map Package pane; however, this is not necessary.
  10. Click Run Run.
    Note:

    It can take several minutes for the Create Mobile Map Package tool to finish running.

    You receive a message that the Create Mobile Map Package tool completed with warnings. If you click the message, you will see the following warning in the bottom of the pop-up: Live traffic is not supported when publishing to runtime.: Navigation with Custom Streets /Routing_ND. This means that live traffic is only supported when the data is published as a service. You are creating this mobile map package for use in Navigator, which works in disconnected environments and does not use services. As such, you can ignore this warning.

Share the package

Share the package with utility workers so that they can use Navigator to route to power line supports.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. In the Geoprocessing pane, click the menu Menu and click Open Another Tool.
    Tip:

    The menu Menu might have a number on it, which indicates the number of geoprocessing tools you have run during your ArcGIS Pro session. If you want to see the types of geoprocessing tools you have run, click the number. The tools are listed in the pop-up. This function allows you to quickly access tools you have used in the session.

  2. In the Search bar, type Share Package and click the Share Package tool in the results.
  3. For the Input Package field, add the mobile map package (.mmpk) you created.

    The Summary, Tags, and Credits fields automatically fill in with default text. Editing these fields is optional.

  4. Check that you would like to share the package within your organization.
    Tip:

    If you decide to share the package with specific groups in your organization, make sure that your mobile workers belong to those groups.

  5. Click Run Run.

    A message appears, indicating that the Share Package tool completed successfully. The package is now shared with your organization. Members can sign in to Navigator, search for the package, and download it to their device to use offline.

Test the map in Navigator

In Navigator, test your map to ensure that utility workers can see, search for, and route to power line supports in San Diego using your custom travel mode. Below are some key things to test for. For more details about how to complete any of these workflows, see the Guided tour.

Note:

You need an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for Navigator for ArcGIS to test your map. You also need a mobile device with Navigator for ArcGIS installed.

  1. Find, download, and open your map.
    You see the map of power line supports with custom roads in San Diego that you created in ArcGIS Pro. You might get the message Cannot go to location. Your location is outside the extent of the map. That's fine—Navigator is just trying to use your GPS location as your start point, but you'll specify a start point within the map extent later, so select OK to dismiss this.
  2. Test whether you can search for a particular power line support by its ID.

    As you type, suggestions appear. By default, the maximum number of suggestions displayed in Navigator is five.

  3. Generate a route to this support to see if utility workers can generate directions to specific supports on your organization's private roads.
    Note:

    If you are not physically located in San Diego, you will have to select a Start Point by dropping a pin on the map.

  4. Choose the travel mode you created to see if utility workers can generate directions to supports that don't highly avoid unpaved roads.
    Note:

    Your travel mode will appear in an alphabetical list along with the other travel modes that come with Navigator. This experience is slightly different than that of choosing a travel mode when you have not created your own.

You have added power line supports and roads to your copy of the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads network dataset, enabled utility workers to search for supports, and created a custom travel mode that incorporates unpaved roads when they are part of the best route. You then packaged all of the data as a mobile map package and shared it with utility workers. Now they can open the map in Navigator and see, search for, and route to power line supports offline, on your organization's private and unpaved roads.