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Add assets

In this exercise, you are the GIS administrator for the City of San Diego. You support the Fire Department by providing geographic data to facilitate its projects, and its upcoming project is inspecting fire hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center. The firefighters need to be able to search for, see, and plan routes to particular fire hydrants to inspect them. To enable the inspections, you need to create a map that they can use in Navigator that contains the fire hydrants and roads.

To provide the map the firefighters need, you'll use ArcGIS Pro. You'll start with the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro network dataset and add the fire hydrant data maintained by your organization. You'll enable searching for fire hydrants, create a custom travel mode for the fire truck, package the data as a mobile map package, and share it with your ArcGIS organization. The firefighters will be able to download the map in Navigator and use it to get to their inspections.

Note:

If you would like to add roads to an Esri-provided navigation map, you need the StreetMap Premium Custom Roads dataset, and should follow either the Add assets and digitize roads exercise or the Add assets and load roads exercise. If you would like to create a map with entirely your own data, see the Make a map with all your own data exercise. For help choosing which exercise to follow, see Decide which exercise to follow.

Requirements

To complete this entire exercise, you need the following products and licenses:

  • ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later
    Note:

    You can create custom navigation maps with your organization's assets, locators, and roads in ArcGIS Pro 1.2 or later. However, you need ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later to create your own travel modes, use feature editing templates, and see the same user interface referenced in this exercise.

  • A mobile device with Navigator for ArcGIS installed
  • An ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for the following:

Your ArcGIS organizational administrator is responsible for configuring these licenses. If you have an ArcGIS organizational account, but need one of these products or licenses, ask your ArcGIS organizational administrator to send an email to services@esri.com. If you don't have an ArcGIS organizational account, sign up for a free trial.

Note:

If you are a member of an organization on ArcGIS Online but need a Navigator for ArcGIS trial license added to it, request a free trial on the ArcGIS Marketplace listing for Navigator.

For this exercise, you will work with a sample dataset from StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro. If you are going to be completing this exercise with your own data, see Get started with StreetMap Premium in ArcGIS Pro before proceeding to the next section.

The products and licenses that are needed to complete particular sections of the exercise are noted at the beginnings of sections.

Open the project in ArcGIS Pro and explore the data

It's important to get an understanding of the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro data before you add fire hydrant data to it. Open the ArcGIS Pro project and familiarize yourself with the data.

Note:

To complete this exercise section, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. Start ArcGIS Pro.
    Note:

    If you don't have it, install ArcGIS Pro.

  2. On the start page, click Open an existing project or Open another project Browse.
  3. To find the project available for this exercise, you'll search on a portal. Under Open, click Portal.
    Portal button in Project pane
  4. Click Browse Browse and then click All Portal All Portal.
  5. In the Search bar, type Navigator Custom Data Tutorial and press Enter.

    The Navigator for ArcGIS - Custom Data Tutorial project appears.

  6. Click the project and click OK.

    The project opens with some of the necessary components of a navigation map: maps and a transportation network dataset that supports routing.

    The StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro project comes with two maps: Navigation with Custom Streets and Add Custom Streets. The Add Custom Streets map contains the imagery basemap, which makes it easier to digitize and edit your organization's streets. Since you only want to add your organization's assets to the map, you won't use the Add Custom Streets map, and will just create a navigation map from the Navigation with Custom Streets map.

    Two maps included in the project

    To see what the Navigation with Custom Streets map contains, review its Contents pane. There is a compressed basemap layer named Navigation Day with Custom Streets. Within the basemap is a transportation network dataset named Routing_ND. This dataset contains rules that affect how routes are generated.

    Note:

    If you'd like to create a navigation map with a night theme, click Basemap Basemap in the Layer group of the Map tab and choose Navigation Night with Custom Streets from the gallery.

    The map does not contain an operational layer of fire hydrants, a geocoding locator to search for hydrants, or a custom travel mode for fire trucks. At this point, if you were to create a navigation map and share it with the firefighters, they would only see the roads they use to route to hydrants. They would not be able to see, search for, or get directions to specific fire hydrants. You will enable firefighters to perform these actions with your navigation map by following this exercise.

    Note:

    If you are following this exercise with your copy of the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro data, you will notice that it is not clipped to a specific project area, in contrast to the exercise data, which has been clipped to the San Diego area. That's okay, because when you package the data later using the Create Mobile Map Package tool, you will have the option to clip to your project extent.

Add an asset layer

Now that you have your project open, and see that the roads are already set up for routing, add the fire hydrant data so that firefighters can view, search for, and route to particular hydrants they need to inspect.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. While viewing the Navigation with Custom Streets map, on the Map tab, click Add Data Add Data.
    Add Data button
    Note:

    If you are following this exercise with your own data and you are adding an operational layer with a coordinate system that's different from the map's coordinate system, the map's coordinate system will by default change to the coordinate system of the first operational layer that you add. If you would rather choose the map's coordinate system, click the Project tab and click Options. Under Application, click Map and Scene and click Spatial Reference. Click the Choose spatial reference option and choose the coordinate system that is appropriate for your map.

  2. Browse to the fire hydrant data that you want to include on the map. The City of San Diego keeps this data in a layer package that is available in a portal. Under Portal, click All Portal All Portal.
  3. In the Search bar, type Navigator tutorial fire hydrants and press Enter.

    The Navigator for ArcGIS Tutorial - Fire Hydrants layer package appears.

  4. Click the layer package, and then click OK to add it to your map.

    Fire hydrants appear on the map around the San Diego Convention Center as purple points, and the layer appears in the Contents pane. The hydrants also have labels.

    Fire hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center

    By this point you have created a map for the firefighters that contains roads and hydrants. However, the symbology of the map could be more understandable, and you have not yet made the hydrants searchable.

Customize the map symbology and labels

Change the symbology and labels of the hydrants so that the firefighters can more easily see and locate them in Navigator. Labels will also help firefighters ensure that they are routing to the correct hydrants.

Note:

To complete this exercise section, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. If the Fire Hydrants layer in the Contents pane is not already highlighted, click it.

    The layer is highlighted. On the ribbon, the Feature Layer contextual tab displays with Appearance, Labeling, and Data tabs.

  2. Click the Appearance tab, and then click Symbology Symbology in the Drawing group.
    Symbology button

    The Symbology pane opens.

  3. In the Symbology pane, click the current symbol.

    The pane changes to show formatting options. You can modify the properties of the current symbol or choose a different symbol from the gallery. In this case, you'll choose a different symbol.

  4. On the maps you make for the Fire Department, you use a particular red cross symbol to represent fire hydrants. You'll use it again here so that the firefighters find the map familiar. In the Search bar, type Cross 3 and press Enter.

    The Cross 3 symbol appears in the search results.

  5. Click the Cross 3 symbol.

    On the map, the symbol for hydrants changes from a purple point to the Cross 3 symbol.

  6. On the Feature Layer contextual tab, click the Labeling tab.
  7. For this layer, the hydrants are labeled based on the SIZE_NUM field by default. When heading to an inspection, the firefighters do not identify hydrants based on this information, though. Rather, they locate hydrants based on their IDs. In the Label Class group, set Field to HYD_ID so that the labels display information that is useful to the firefighters.
    Field

    If you're not seeing the labels appear, make sure that Enable Labeling Enable Labeling, highlighted in blue in the above image, is on.

    Note:

    If you are using your own data to complete this exercise, make sure that the label expression for the label classes in your operational layers is set to VBScript. By default, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later uses Arcade label expressions; however, Navigator does not support these. To change the label expressions for your operational layers, click Expression Label expression in the Label Class group of the Labeling tab. In the Label Class pane, set the Language field to VBScript and click Apply.

    Hydrants are now easier to identify because they are labeled by their IDs on the map. The labels will also help firefighters verify that they are generating routes to the correct hydrants in Navigator.

  8. In the Text Symbol group, set the label size to 11.
    Label size
    Note:

    If you are using your own data to complete this exercise and you want to edit its symbology, make sure the symbols are approximately the same size as the symbols in this project. This will ensure that the symbols appear clearly on the map after your mobile workers download it in Navigator.

    You now have a map similar to the one shown below with symbology that's familiar and clear to the firefighters. Now they can use the map to view the hydrants they need to route to and the roads they will use for routing. Next you will make the hydrants searchable.

    Newly symbolized fire hydrants
  9. Click Save Project Save.

Create a locator to search for assets

Since firefighters identify hydrants they need to inspect by their IDs, enable searching for fire hydrants by ID in Navigator by creating a custom address locator. Enabling search by ID using the Create Address Locator tool allows firefighters to quickly find their destinations.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. If the Fire hydrants layer is not selected in the Contents pane, click it.
  2. On the Analysis tab, in the Geoprocessing group, click Tools Toolbox.
    Tools button

    The Geoprocessing pane appears.

  3. In the Geoprocessing pane, type Create Address Locator and click this tool in the search results.
    Note:

    In the search results, you might see the Create Composite Address Locator tool. You can use this tool to create a composite locator, but the Create Mobile Map Package tool that you will use later in the exercise also creates composite locators.

  4. In the Create Address Locator pane, for Address Locator Style, choose General - Gazetteer from the drop-down menu.

    The locator style is the template for a locator. The General - Gazetteer locator style is meant to find geographic place-names or landmarks in an area or the world. For this exercise you could also use the General - Single Field locator style, which is used to find features that are identified by a name or code. See Commonly used address locator styles in the ArcGIS Pro help for information about the various types of locator styles and the purposes of each.

  5. Since the firefighters need to be able to search for fire hydrants, choose Fire Hydrants for Reference Data.

    The reference data is which data the locator will search through to find a specific feature. In this case, the locator will search the hydrant layer for a hydrant. See Reference data in the ArcGIS Pro help for information about the various purposes of reference data.

  6. Since you want to enable searching by the hydrant's ID, choose HYD_ID for Place Name.

    Place Name is the attribute the locator will use to find a feature. In this case, you are making a locator that will search for hydrants by their IDs.

  7. In the Output Address Locator field, edit the name and file location for the address locator if you'd like it to be created in a different location.
  8. Check Enable suggestions.

    This causes suggestions to appear as mobile workers search for an asset in Navigator. At this point the values in the fields of the Create Address Locator pane should match those shown below.

    Completed Create Address Locator pane
  9. Click Run Run.
    You receive a message that the Create Address Locator tool completed successfully. Your firefighters can now search for fire hydrants by ID in Navigator.

Test asset searching

Before sharing the map with the firefighters, test whether search is working properly by searching for a specific fire hydrant.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. In ArcGIS Pro, you can run a search by using the Locate tool. On the Map tab, in the Inquiry group, click Locate Locate.
    Locate button

    The Locate pane opens.

  2. In the Search bar, type the ID of a hydrant on the map that you would like to locate. For example, type the ID SDH8606 and press Enter.

    The map zooms to the hydrant that you searched for, and the hydrant appears in the search results in the Locate pane. Your address locator works.

    Note:

    Even though you have enabled suggestions, these will not appear when you are searching for an asset in ArcGIS Pro unless you publish the locator to ArcGIS Server. However, suggestions will appear when using the locator to search in Navigator.

Add a general address locator to the project

In addition to searching for fire hydrants, firefighters might want to search based on street addresses or intersections. To enable these types of searches in Navigator, add the general USA address locator to the project. This locator comes with StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro. It's not required to add this locator to the project.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. If the Catalog pane is not visible, click the View tab and click Catalog Pane Catalog Pane.
  2. Under Folders > Navigator_for_ArcGIS_-_Custom_Data_Tutorial > p14, find USA.loc.
  3. Right-click the locator and click Add To Project.
    Tip:

    To make sure that you've successfully added the USA locator to the project, click the arrow next to the Locators folder. The USA locator should appear in the list of locators.

Create your own travel mode

Since your firefighters will be traveling to inspections in their fire truck, they need directions that avoid low bridges, so they don't get stuck underneath them. Create a travel mode with a specific height restriction that your firefighters will choose in Navigator and provide them with routes that avoid roads with low bridges, to prevent accidents and increase driver safety.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst extension.

  1. In the Contents pane, right-click the Routing_ND layer within the Navigation Day with Custom Streets basemap, and click Properties Properties.
  2. On the lower left of the dialog box, click Travel Modes.

    You see details about the Driving Time travel mode, which comes with Navigator.

  3. Click the menu Menu in the upper right, and click New New.

    Fields for your new travel mode appear on the dialog box.

  4. The first field is for the name of your new travel mode. Replace the default name New Travel Mode with Fire Truck Height Restriction so that the firefighters know what the purpose of this travel mode is.
  5. In the Description field, type Use this travel mode to avoid roads with low bridges while driving a fire truck. to provide the firefighters with more details about this travel mode.
  6. In the Type field, choose Trucking, since your workers will be traveling by truck.
  7. Click Costs to expand this section.
  8. In the Distance Attribute field, change the units from Miles to Kilometers, since all parameter values are in terms of the metric system for StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro, and for mobile workers to use your travel mode in Navigator, units must be used consistently.
  9. Click Restrictions and Parameters to expand this section.

    A list of travel mode attributes and parameter values appears. Which attributes you see depends on the attributes of your network dataset.

  10. Scroll down until you see the Height Restriction attribute. Check the box next to it.

    Two parameters appear under the attribute: Restriction Usage and Vehicle Height (meters).

  11. Ensure that the value for Restriction Usage is Prohibited, since you never want firefighters to travel on a road with a bridge that is lower than the truck.
  12. In the Vehicle Height (meters) field, type 4.9, because the fire trucks are 4.9 meters tall.
  13. Click OK.

    You have created a custom travel mode that allows your drivers to avoid roads with low bridges.

Test your travel mode

Before packaging the map, test whether your travel mode is working correctly by creating stops on either side of a bridge that's lower than the fire truck and seeing if the route avoids the bridge.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst extension.

  1. In the Locate pane, in the Search bar, type the ID SDH8789 and press Enter.

    The map zooms to the hydrant that you searched for. Slightly zoom out until you see the hydrant labeled SDH24679, west of SDH8789, on the other side of the three bridges, symbolized by thick yellow lines. These bridges have a clearance of about 4.3 meters when they cross C Street, which is too low for the 4.9-meter-tall fire truck. To see if your travel mode avoids traveling under the bridges on C Street, in the following steps, you will create stops on top of both of these hydrants and run network analysis using the Driving Time travel mode and your travel mode. The route produced with the Driving Time travel mode should involve traveling under the bridges on C Street, but the route produced with the Fire Truck Height Restriction travel mode should not.

  2. On the Analysis tab, click Network Analysis and click Route Route.
    Tip:

    In the Network Analysis drop-down menu, under Network Data Source, make sure that Routing_ND appears. This is the network dataset that you want to test. If it doesn't appear, click Change Network Data Source, click Routing_ND, and then click OK.

    In the Contents pane, a Route layer appears. This is the layer you will use to add stops to the road network.

  3. Click the Edit tab and click Create Create Features.
  4. In the Create Features pane, search for stops and click this in the results.
  5. Create one stop on top of the SDH24679 hydrant and one stop on top of the SDH8789 hydrant.
  6. On the Route tab, in the Travel Settings group, make sure that the Mode field is set to Driving Time.
  7. In the Analysis group, click Run Run.

    A route is generated between the two stops that involves traveling under the bridges on C Street, as expected, since this travel mode doesn't have any height restrictions.

    Route generated with the Driving Time travel mode
  8. In the Travel Settings group, set the Mode field to Fire Truck Height Restriction and click Run Run again.

    A route is generated that doesn't involve traveling under the bridges on C Street, as desired. Rather, the route involves traveling under the bridges on Broadway, where the bridge clearance of at least 4.9 meters is tall enough for the fire truck.

    Route generated with the Fire Truck Height Restriction travel mode

    You have successfully created a custom travel mode that allows your drivers to avoid roads with bridges that are lower than the fire truck. When you package your navigation map using the Create Mobile Map Package geoprocessing tool in the next section, your custom travel mode will be included, so your mobile workers can access it in Navigator.

  9. Since these stops were only created for testing purposes, in the Contents pane, right-click the Route layer, click Remove Remove, and click Discard.

Package the data

You now have the fire hydrants, roads, locators, and a custom travel mode ready for your firefighters. With the Create Mobile Map Package geoprocessing tool, combine all of these components into one file that you can share with firefighters to use offline in Navigator. After you share the mobile map package with firefighters, they will download it to their device, just like any other map in Navigator.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary. You also need ArcGIS Network Analyst extension.

  1. In the Geoprocessing pane, click the menu Menu and click Open Another Tool.
    Open Another Tool
  2. Type Create Mobile Map Package and click this tool in the search results.

    The Create Mobile Map Package pane opens. By default, the current map is used as the Input Map. If you are using the exercise data, you will not change this, but in a production environment you can add multiple maps and basemaps into the package.

  3. In the Output File field, specify an output location and name for the package that firefighters will search for in Navigator.
    Note:

    Firefighters search for the package based on the name provided in the Output File field; however, after they download the package, its name changes to the name provided in the Title field in the Create Mobile Map Package pane.

  4. In the Input Locator field, click the drop-down arrow to choose the fire hydrant locator.
    Note:

    Since you created this locator in this session, it appears first in the drop-down menu. If you created it in another ArcGIS Pro session, you have to browse for it.

  5. In the second Input Locator field, choose the USA locator.

    Later, when you click Run Run, you will create a composite locator that enables mobile workers to search for places along with your organization's assets.

  6. Zoom to your desired map extent.
  7. Set Extent to Current Display Extent.
    Current Display Extent changes to As Specified Below in the drop-down menu, and the minimum and maximum values of the extent appear.
  8. If you would like the package in Navigator to match the current extent in ArcGIS Pro, check Clip Features. Everything on the map that is outside the current extent will be clipped. This minimizes the package size, making it faster and easier to share.
  9. If you would like to, edit the remaining fields in the Create Mobile Map Package pane; however, this is not necessary.
  10. Click Run Run.
    Note:

    It can take several minutes for the Create Mobile Map Package tool to finish running.

    You receive a message that the Create Mobile Map Package tool completed with warnings. If you click the message, you will see the following warning in the bottom of the pop-up: Live traffic is not supported when publishing to runtime.: Navigation with Custom Streets /Routing_ND. This means that live traffic is only supported when the data is published as a service. You are creating this mobile map package for use in Navigator, which works in disconnected environments and does not use services. As such, you can ignore this warning.

Share the package

Share the package with your firefighters so that they can use Navigator to route to their hydrant inspections.

Note:

To complete this section of the exercise, ArcGIS Pro 1.4 or later and an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for ArcGIS Pro 1.4 Basic or higher are necessary.

  1. In the Geoprocessing pane, click the menu Menu and click Open Another Tool.
    Tip:

    The menu Menu might have a number on it, which indicates the number of geoprocessing tools you have run during your ArcGIS Pro session. If you want to see the types of geoprocessing tools you have run, click the number. The tools are listed in the pop-up. This function allows you to quickly access tools you have used in the session.

  2. In the Search bar, type Share Package and click the Share Package tool in the results.
  3. For the Input Package field, add the mobile map package (.mmpk) you created.

    The Summary, Tags, and Credits fields automatically fill in with default text. Editing these fields is optional.

  4. Check that you would like to share the package within your organization.
    Tip:

    If you decide to share the package with specific groups in your organization, make sure that your mobile workers belong to those groups.

  5. Click Run Run.

    A message appears, indicating that the Share Package tool completed successfully. The package is now shared with your organization. Members can sign in to Navigator, search for the package, and download it to their device to use offline.

Test the map in Navigator

In Navigator, test your map to ensure that firefighters can see, search for, and route to fire hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center. Below are some key things to test for. For more details about how to complete any of these workflows, see the Guided tour.

Note:

You need an ArcGIS organizational account with licensing for Navigator for ArcGIS to test your map. You also need a mobile device with Navigator for ArcGIS installed.

  1. Find, download, and open your map.
    You see the map of hydrants near the San Diego Convention Center that you created in ArcGIS Pro. You might get the message Cannot go to location. Your location is outside the extent of the map. That's fine—Navigator is just trying to use your GPS location as your start point, but you'll specify a start point within the map extent later, so select OK to dismiss this.
  2. Test whether you can search for a particular hydrant by its ID.

    As you type, suggestions appear. By default, the maximum number of suggestions displayed in Navigator is five.

  3. Generate a route to this hydrant to see if firefighters can generate directions to hydrants.
    Note:

    If you are not physically located in San Diego, you will have to select a Start Point by dropping a pin on the map.

  4. Choose the travel mode you created to see if firefighters can generate directions to hydrants that don't involve traveling on roads with low bridges.
    Note:

    Your travel mode will appear in an alphabetical list along with the other travel modes that come with Navigator. This experience is slightly different than that of choosing a travel mode when you have not created your own.

You have added fire hydrants to the StreetMap Premium for ArcGIS Pro network dataset and enabled firefighters to search for these hydrants. You also created a custom travel mode that firefighters can use to receive the best routes when traveling in their fire truck. You then packaged all of the data as a mobile map package and shared it with the firefighters. Now they can open the map in Navigator and see, search for, and route to fire hydrants offline in their truck.