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Import file

Import File allows you to import shapefiles of polygons and points and Excel files containing address information. You can import Excel files with a file size limit of 1 MB. Shapefiles can be imported with a file size limit of 3 MB. Shapefiles must be a single zipped file containing .SHP and .PRJ files.

There is a limit of 100 records when importing shapefiles. When there are more than 100 records, the first 100 will be imported. Files containing more than 1,000 records can't be imported.

When importing Excel or point shapefiles, you can choose styles to best visualize the information on the map. These can be visualized as a sequence of colors, such as light-to-dark, or as graduated circles, such as from small-to-large. For example, you can use colors or circles to show population. You can also use unique symbols, import custom symbols and create heat maps. Heat maps are useful when many of the points on the map are close together and difficult to distinguish.

  1. To access Import Files, click Maps, Add Data and click Import File.

    Import File appears on the left.

  2. In Select a file to import, click Browse to choose the file you want to import.

    Once selected, the file name appears in the Select file to import text box.

  3. Click Import.

    The next steps will vary depending on the type of file you've imported. You can import an Excel file, a polygonal shapefile, or a point shapefile.

Import an Excel file

  1. After importing the Excel file, confirm the column headings that will be extracted from the selected file. You can choose from Address, City, State, ZIP Code and/or Latitude and Longitude.
  2. Click Next.
  3. If any corrections are needed for invalid addresses, you can make them here.
    • You can fix the matches one at a time, use fix all to make corrections using or ignore the point.
    • You can fix all of the matches. Using the edit link next to the invalid addresses, you can correct these and click Find Again.
    • If you don't want to make any corrections, click Add matches to map.

    The locations successfully found appear on the map.

  4. You can choose a style for this layer. You can choose from:
    • Location (Single Symbol) — Showing data on a map with a single symbol shows the distribution and may reveal patterns. For example, mapping of list of restaurant locations, you would likely see the restaurants together in a business district.

      To choose a symbol, click the arrow to access the drop-down menu. You can select from available symbols or import your own custom symbol. Change the symbol size with the size slider.

      Choose a symbol for this layer
      Note:

      Symbols in GIF, PNG, and JPG file formats can be uploaded with a limit of 1 MB. The recommended size of the image is 120 x 120 pixels or less.

    • Type (Unique Symbols) — Use unique symbols to show different kinds of things rather than counts of numerical measurements. For example, you can use different colors to represent restaurant cuisine types. Ideally, your layer would show fewer than 10 categories; more categories than that become hard to distinguish by color alone. As a default, if your data has more than 10 categories, the 10 most common will be shown and the remaining ones will be grouped together into an Others category.

      Click Options to choose the style for the symbols and set the color ramp, change the attribute or edit the symbols individually. Changes appear in the legend.

    • Counts and Amounts (Color) — If you have numeric data, you can distinguish features based on a color gradient. There are different kinds of color gradients that you can use, for example, a simple light-to-dark color scheme can show low-to-high data values for age or income.

      Click Options to choose the style for the symbols, change the attribute and adjust the graph. Click Classify data to adjust the method and breaks. Changes appear in the legend.

    • Counts and Amounts (Size) — This uses an orderable sequence of different sizes to represent your numerical data or ranked categories. These proportional symbol maps use an intuitive logic that larger symbols equate to larger numbers. You can adjust the size of the symbols for clarification. For example, you could use graduated symbols to show sales or number of employees.

      Click Options to choose the style for the symbols, change the attribute and adjust the graph and clusters. Click Classify data to adjust the method and breaks. Changes appear in the legend.

    • Heat Map — Heat maps can be used when mapping the location of point features. These are useful when many of the points on the map are close together and aren't easily distinguished. Heat maps use the points in the layer to calculate and display the relative density of points on the map as smoothly varying sets of colors ranging from cool (low density of points) to hot (many points). It is best to avoid heat maps if you have only a few point features; instead, map the actual points.

      Click Options to change the color bar. You can also move the Area of Influence slider to adjust the clusters. Changes appear in the legend.

    Using the Select tool, you can select heat map polygons to create reports or select underlying point data to create rings, drive time and walk time.

  5. You can use the drop-down menu to select the label column from the Excel file. This is optional.
  6. Check Open labels for all points if you want a label open for each location after importing. By default, this is unchecked.
  7. Click Next.
    • Click Yes, add rings to create rings, drive time or walk time for the points on the map. Click the use bands check box to add bands. If you use drive time, you can select More options to access more capabilities. You can create a maximum of 100 rings, drive times and walk times at one time. If your Excel file has more than 100 points, click Change selections to select the points for rings, drive times and bands.
    • Click No, save as layer and enter the layer name in the Save Layer dialog box.
  8. Your sites are saved in My Content.
    • You can get reports for your site by clicking Get Reports.
    • You can access your sites in My Content by clicking Organize Sites.
    • You can click I'm Done to close the panel.

Change points

The Change Points link allows you to indicate the points in your Excel file to display on the map. Once displayed, you can create rings, drive time or walk time.

In the Confirm selections dialog box, you can select the points in the following ways:

  • First 100
  • All
  • Use search to narrow the spreadsheet entries
  • Click individual check boxes

Import a polygonal shapefile

The following are steps to show you how to import a polygonal shapefile into the your project.

  1. Click Browse and select the zipped shapefile you want to import. Click Import
    Import File
  2. After importing your polygonal shapefile, you may choose how to save the shapes and the style to apply to it.
  3. If the imported shapefile contains multiple shapes (polygons), choose Yes to combine them into a single site, or No to save each shape as a separate site.
    Choosing how to save your shapefiles

    If the imported shapefile doesn't contain multiple shapes, then this choice will not appear.

  4. The polygon site(s) created will be saved in the current project as a new Polygons (Sites) layer.
  5. Use the New Layer Name text box to change the name assigned to the new layer from the default.
    Change layer name
  6. If the imported shapefile has one or more fields in its attribute table, you may choose one of them in the Choose a name field to label the sites drop-down to use as the site name for the sites created.
    Choose a name field
  7. Check Open labels for all sites if you want a label open for each site created after importing. By default, this is unchecked.
  8. You have options to change border and fill properties for your layer. Click Next when done.
    Choose a style for your layer
    • To change the color transparency, use the slider. Click No fill to remove the fill for the site on the map.
    • To change the colors for the border, click the color picker and select the color. Click No border to remove the borders for the site on the map.

    Your sites are saved in the current project, in a new layer under the section Polygons (Sites) and you will be prompted to perform one of the following tasks:

    Import complete
    • You can initiate a Suitability Analysis for your site by clicking Suitability Analysis. The workflow will begin with the sites currently on the map selected (including the polygon sites just created by importing this shapefile).
    • You can get reports for your site by clicking Get Reports.
    • You can access your sites in the current Project by clicking Organize Sites.
    • You can click I’m Done to close the panel.

Import a point shapefile

  1. You can choose a style for this layer. You can choose from:
    • Location (Single Symbol) — Showing data on a map with a single symbol shows the distribution and may reveal patterns. For example, mapping of list of restaurant locations, you would likely see the restaurants together in a business district.

      To choose a symbol, click the arrow to access the drop-down menu. You can select from available symbols or import your own custom symbol. Change the symbol size with the size slider.

      Choose a symbol for this layer
      Note:

      Symbols in GIF, PNG, and JPG file formats can be uploaded with a limit of 1 MB. The recommended size of the image is 120 x 120 pixels or less.

    • Type (Unique Symbols) — Use unique symbols to show different kinds of things rather than counts of numerical measurements. For example, you can use different colors to represent restaurant cuisine types. Ideally, your layer would show fewer than 10 categories; more categories than that become hard to distinguish by color alone. As a default, if your data has more than 10 categories, the 10 most common will be shown and the remaining ones will be grouped together into an Others category.

      Click Options to choose the style for the symbols and set the color ramp, change the attribute or edit the symbols individually. Changes appear in the legend.

    • Counts and Amounts (Color) — If you have numeric data, you can distinguish features based on a color gradient. There are different kinds of color gradients that you can use, for example, a simple light-to-dark color scheme can show low-to-high data values for age or income.

      Click Options to choose the style for the symbols, change the attribute and adjust the graph. Click Classify data to adjust the method and breaks. Changes appear in the legend.

    • Counts and Amounts (Size) — This uses an orderable sequence of different sizes to represent your numerical data or ranked categories. These proportional symbol maps use an intuitive logic that larger symbols equate to larger numbers. You can adjust the size of the symbols for clarification. For example, you could use graduated symbols to show sales or number of employees.

      Click Options to choose the style for the symbols, change the attribute and adjust the graph and clusters. Click Classify data to adjust the method and breaks. Changes appear in the legend.

    • Heat Map — Heat maps can be used when mapping the location of point features. These are useful when many of the points on the map are close together and aren't easily distinguished. Heat maps use the points in the layer to calculate and display the relative density of points on the map as smoothly varying sets of colors ranging from cool (low density of points) to hot (many points). It is best to avoid heat maps if you have only a few point features; instead, map the actual points.

      Click Options to change the color bar. You can also move the Area of Influence slider to adjust the clusters. Changes appear in the legend.

    Using the Select tool, you can select heat map polygons to create reports or select underlying point data to create rings, drive time and walk time.

  2. Use the drop-down menu to select the name column from the shapefile.
  3. Check Open labels for all points if you want a label open for each location after importing. By default, this is unchecked.
  4. Click Next.
    • Click Yes, add rings to create rings, drive time or walk time for the points on the map. Click the use bands check box to add bands. If you use drive time, you can select More options to access more capabilities. You can create a maximum of 100 rings, drive times and walk times at one time. Click Apply.
    • Click No, save as layer and enter the layer name in the Save Layer dialog box.
  5. Your sites are saved in My Content.
    • You can get reports for your site by clicking Get Reports.
    • You can access your sites in My Content by clicking Organize Sites.
    • You can click I'm Done to close the panel.

Trouble importing a shapefile?

Here are some tips for importing shapefiles.

  • You can import standard compressed archive .zip files; other compression formats aren't supported at this time.
  • Files containing more than 1,000 features can't be imported.
  • The shapefile must be less than 3 MB in size.
  • The ZIP archive must contain the .shp, .shx, .dbf and .prj files that comprise the shapefile.
  • There should only be one shapefile in a ZIP archive.
  • The files must be stored directly in the root (the central directory) of the ZIP archive, not in the directories within the archive. If your ZIP file viewer shows path information, the path should be blank.
  • You can import standard compressed archive .zip files; other compression formats aren't supported at this time.
  • You can't import shapefiles containing multi patch or multipoint geometries.
  • The shapefile should contain valid geometries. Currently, self-intersections in polygon shapefiles aren't supported. If you have ArcGIS for Desktop, you can use the Repair Geometry tool to correct invalid geometries in shapefiles.
  • The shapefile must have an accompanying .prj file in which the coordinate system of the data is defined. If you have ArcGIS for Desktop, you can define the coordinate system of a shapefile, which creates an appropriate .prj file for the shapefile. You need to know the appropriate coordinate system to choose for your data. See defining the coordinate system for a shapefile by selecting an existing coordinate system for more information.