Use Neighborhood Stabilization

The Neighborhood Stabilization solution delivers a set of capabilities that help you conduct property surveys, measure the fragility of neighborhoods, track blight, demolition activity, and publish a focused set of information products for citizens in your community.

In this topic, you’ll learn how to use the solution by assuming the role of a user and performing the workflows below.

Identify neighborhood change

The Neighborhood Early Warning project can be used to understand neighborhoods trending in a positive or negative direction and ultimately measure the fragility of neighborhoods over time.

You will start by assuming the role of a data analyst in a neighborhood revitalization task force responsible for organizing key neighborhood indicators. You are asked to use the Neighborhood Stabilization project to identify neighborhoods trending in a positive or negative direction.

  1. From the Neighborhood Stabilization solution click the Neighborhood Stabilization item under Solution Contents to open the item details of the desktop application template.
  2. Click Download and place the contents on your computer.
  3. Using Explorer, browse to the NeighborhoodEarlyWarning.zip folder and extract it.
  4. Open the Neighborhood Stabilization ArcGIS Pro project.
  5. On the View tab, in the Windows group, click Catalog, and click Catalog Pane.
  6. In the Catalog pane, expand Maps and review the maps provided.
    Note:

    The map provided in this project is used by data analysts to identify neighborhoods trending in a positive or negative direction and ultimately measure their fragility over time.

  7. In the Catalog pane, expand the Tasks folder, and double-click on the Neighborhood Early Warning task.
  8. In the Tasks pane, click on the How to Use Neighborhood Early Warning task group to expand the collection of tasks.
  9. Follow the steps in each task.

Perform property condition surveys

Property Condition Survey leverages location-enabled photos produced by many commercially available cameras and simplifies data processing so street-level photo collections can be gathered on a regular basis. Photo collections can then be used in the Property Condition Survey app and/or be classified using Microsoft's Custom Vision service to identify property where overgrowth, graffiti, and boarded windows may exist.

Street-level photo acquisition

To start, you’ll assume the role of a data analyst that needs to decide what type of camera will be used to acquire street-level photos. The Photo Survey toolbox has been designed to work with standard EXIF data captured by commercially available cameras and there are several on the market today that can be used to collect photos.

When selecting cameras and planning photo collection for your community, consider the following:

  1. Is the camera well suited for diverse weather conditions and can it be mounted on the side of a vehicle or on a window of a vehicle?
  2. Does the camera take photos on pre-defined intervals (for example, a photo taken every two seconds) and acquire GPS coordinate values for each photo taken?
  3. Does the camera write photo data in a standard EXIF format?
  4. How many photos can be stored on a given camera and how will you get photos off the device?
  5. How many vehicles will you use to acquire photos for your entire community? You will need two cameras for each vehicle used to acquire photos.
  6. The speed you will travel to acquire the photos. The slower you can drive, the more photos you will acquire for each property.
  7. The routes used to acquire photos and if those routes will cover every property in your community.
  8. Can you use vehicles (for example, trash trucks and street cleaners) or employees (for example, code enforcement officers and assessors) already canvassing the community to acquire photos?
  9. Would volunteer organizations working in your community partner with you to acquire photos?

Review Property Condition Survey project

Now you will assume role of a data analyst in a neighborhood revitalization task force responsible for configuring the property condition survey. You are asked to configure the Property Condition Survey app using the map authored during the publish map step in the ArcGIS Pro project.

  1. Start ArcGIS Pro and open the Property Condition Survey project package from the active portal.
  2. On the View tab, in the Windows group, click Catalog, and click CatalogPane.
  3. In the Catalog pane, expand Databases and review the sample survey questions provided with the Property Condition Survey project.
  4. In the Catalog pane, expand Tasks and double-click the Property Condition Survey task.
  5. Follow the steps in the Property Condition Survey task to setup the Property Condition Survey app.

Calculate blight probability

Now you will assume role of a data scientist in a neighborhood revitalization task force responsible for configuring the property condition survey. You are asked to calculate the blight probability in the images taken at street-level to augment manual surveys.

  1. Create a new account or sign in to Microsoft Custom Vision.
  2. Once your account has been created, accept the terms and conditions.
  3. If necessary, create a new resource group for Custom Vision within the Azure Portal.
  4. On the Custom Vision landing page, click the cog in the top right corner of the app.
  5. Copy the Training Key, Prediction Key, Prediction Resource ID, and Prediction Endpoint for your account.
  6. Use the copied values in the Detect Blight task in the Property Condition Survey project.
  7. Once you have run the Detect Blight task, review your results in the Photo Points layer published in the Publish Map task in the Property Condition Survey project.

Survey property condition

Now you will assume the role of a community volunteer. You are concerned with neighborhoods in your community and would like to contribute by filling out the Property Condition Survey.

  1. In a browser, go to the Neighborhood Stabilization ArcGIS Hub site, find Property Condition Survey in the Neighborhood Stabilization Applications section, and click the Explore button.
  2. The Property Condition Survey opens with login screen. Use your twitter user, or fill out the survey anonymously.
    Tip:

    If you choose to login with your twitter credentials, you’ll be able to keep track of the total number of surveys that you’ve completed, and your overall ranking.

  3. Answer the survey questions based on the photo that is presented in the main panel.
    Tip:

    You can use the thumbnail images on the lower part of the screen to cycle through all the available photos for the property. The heart icon in the upper right is used to denote the best photo available for the property.

  4. Click Submitsurvey to complete the report.

Track demolition activity

Demolition activity can have a significant impact on property value and the financial cost to a community. Demolition Tracker can be used by the general public to locate planned, contracted, and completed building demolitions.

Now you assume the role of a resident in a local community. You are concerned with where demolitions have occurred, contracted, and planned, and finally what the total cost is to the community.

  1. In a browser, go to the Neighborhood Stabilization ArcGIS Hub site, find Demolition Tracker in the Neighborhood Stabilization Applications section, and click the Explore button.
  2. Enter your address in the search box or zoom to a location directly on the map.
  3. Click Planned Demolitions to view specific addresses of buildings planned for demolitions.
  4. Click a specific demolition to view the neighborhood, use description, comments, and planned date, and estimated cost.
  5. Click Contracted Demolitions to view specific addresses of buildings contracted for demolitions.
  6. Click a specific demolition to view the neighborhood, use description, comments, contractor, scheduled date, and quoted cost.
  7. Click Completed Demolitions to view specific addresses of buildings demolished.
  8. Click a specific demolition to view the neighborhood, use description, comments, contractor, completed date, and actual cost.

Monitor blight status

Blight complaints can have a significant impact on property value and could have a substantial remediation costs associate with them. Blight Status Dashboard can be used by local government leaders to proactively monitor the status of blight complaints and efforts made to reduce blighted properties.

Now you will assume the role of a local government leader. You are concerned with where blight reports have been submitted and the resolution status.

  1. In a browser, go to the Blight Status Dashboard app.
  2. The Blight Status Dashboard opens with an overview of the current blight related reports.
    Note:

    The overview displays key metrics. This information gives management a quick overview of the number of blight reports in their community.

  3. Click the Blight Status Dashboard tab and explore the blight reports.
  4. In the filter on the top left of the dashboard, click on status of the reports.
  5. Finally, review the Report Type panel in the lower center of the dashboard to see the breakdown of report type.