Use Mosquito Surveillance

The Mosquito Surveillance solution delivers a set of capabilities that help you record mosquito counts by species at surveillance sites, visualize trends over time, track where mosquitos, chickens, birds, or humans have tested positive for vector-borne diseases and share this information with internal and external stakeholders.

In this topic, you’ll learn how to use the Mosquito Surveillance solution by assuming various roles and performing these various workflows.

Monitor mosquito populations

You will first assume the role of a biologist in the mosquito control agency responsible for processing the samples collected at the trap sites across the community. You will use the samples to identify the species of mosquitoes, the size of the population and record the counts for each surveillance site.

You can then visualize trends and share current and historical mosquito populations data with internal stakeholders. This can also be used to educate the general public about the types of mosquitoes prevalent in the area, the diseases they are capable of carrying, when they are most active, and how to best protect themselves from the spread of vector-borne diseases.

  1. In a browser, go to the Mosquito Population Surveillance app.
  2. From the list or the map select one of the surveillance sites.
  3. You will see the details on the site and a history of counts by species recorded in past observations.
  4. Click the Add a comment button.
  5. Fill out the counts for each species found at the surveillance site.
  6. Click Submit.
  7. Repeat for each surveillance site.

    You can now visualize the trends of the different species of mosquitoes at each surveillance site over time.

  8. In a browser, go to the Mosquito Population Surveillance Charts app.
  9. In the Population Charts pane, under Search for an address or locate on map, type McDowell Grove Forest into the search text box and press the Enter key. Or select one of the mosquitos on the map.
  10. Click a mosquito species in the pane to see the population trend for the surveillance site.

Track vector-borne diseases

You will continue your role as a biologist in the mosquito control agency. You typically send a small sampling of mosquitoes collected at each surveillance site to the lab to be tested for vector-borne disease. Dead birds are often reported or found in the community and sent off for testing as well. Health departments may share with mosquito control agencies general locations (so that personal health information is protected) where a vector-borne disease has been transmitted to a human.

You will track where mosquitos, chickens, birds, or humans have tested positive for vector-borne diseases. This information can be used to plan adulticide spray operations that prevent the spread of a disease. This can also be used to educate the general public about the types of vector-borne diseases found in the community and how they can help to prevent the spread of disease.

  1. In a browser, go to the Mosquito Health Concerns app.
  2. In the Edit pane, click the West Nile Virus template.
  3. Click on the map to place the location the disease was found.
  4. Fill out the Public Health Reports form with the details of the Agent carrying the disease, when it was reported, and any additional comments.
  5. Click Save.
  6. Click the Edit drop-down and choose Public Health Concerns.
  7. Click Public Health Concerns template. This template can be used to generalize the location of positive tests in a human to avoid revealing personal health information.
  8. On the map draw the boundary of the generalized location of the positive human case.
  9. Fill out the Public Health Concerns form with the details of the type of disease, when it was reported, and any additional comments.
  10. Click Save.

    You can now visualize locations and counts of vector-borne cases across the community.

  11. In a browser, go to the Mosquito Health Concerns Summary app.
  12. In the Health Concerns pane, expand the Mosquito and Bird Cases and Human Cases to view the counts by each disease.
  13. Pan and zoom around the map to see how the counts change for different areas in the community and find areas of concentration.