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Create a map

To create a map, you must have added data to your page. A map is created by default when you add data from ArcGIS Online, including layers from ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World. If the dataset you added doesn't contain a Location field, you must enable location before you can create a map.

To create interactive maps, select a location, string, number, or rate/ratio field, or a complete dataset, from the data pane and drag it onto the page, or use the Map button at the top of the data pane.

Drag to create a map
Drag a layer or field to the Map drop zone to create a map. You can also create a map by selecting a field and clicking Map above the data pane.

Tip:

Drag-N Drop You can copy a map card onto another page by dragging it to the New Page tab New page or an already created page. If you want to copy the map onto the same page, use Ctrl+C to copy and Ctrl+V to paste.

The role of the field that you select determines the type of map you create. You can also switch to a map from an existing chart or table. The type of map you switch to depends on the data inputs from the existing card. For example, a bar chart switches to a category map. A histogram switches to a proportional symbol map.

To learn more about the data requirements for each map type, as well as examples and information on properties you can change and interact with, see the individual map topics, such as unique values maps and link maps.

After you have a map on your page, you can begin exploring your data using spatial analysis or change the style of your map.

A warning icon Warning indicates that the map is not displaying all of the features from the dataset. The warning will be displayed for maps with more than 100,000 features within the map extent. Click on the icon to display the number of features being rendered. The complete dataset will still be used for spatial analysis, provided there are no filters or selections, even if the full dataset is not being rendered.

Tip:

If you are using a point dataset, switching to a binned map will allow you to display all of the data.

Map types

There are several types of maps that can be created using Insights for ArcGIS. Insights uses smart mapping to create the best type of map for the data you want to visualize, so you know you are always getting the best type of map for the field that you are mapping.

The table below indicates the inputs for each map, related visualizations you can switch to using the Visualization type button Visualization type, and questions the map can help you answer.

VisualizationData typesRelated visualization typesQuestions it can help you answer

Binned map

From a map layer showing point data, choose the Bins symbol type from the Layer options pane.

  • Heat map
  • Location map

Where is it located?

How is it distributed?

Where are high values?

Where are low values?

Unique values map

Map styled by one string field.

  • Summary table
  • Bar chart
  • Column chart
  • Donut chart
  • Treemap
  • Bubble chart
  • Line graph

Where is it located?

How is it distributed (by category)?

Choropleth map

Map styled by one number or rate/ratio field.

  • Histogram
  • Box plot
  • KPI card

How is it distributed?

Link map

Map showing the links between two location fields.

None

How is it related?

Heat map

From a map layer showing point data, choose the Heat map symbol type from the Layer options pane.

  • Binned map
  • Location map

How is it distributed?

Location map

One location field (Required)

  • Binned map
  • Heat map

Where is it located?

How is it distributed?

Proportional symbol map

Map styled by one numeric field.

  • Histogram
  • Box plot
  • KPI card

Where is it located?

How is it distributed?

Where are high values?

Where are low values?

Change a basemap

The default basemap used for your map cards will be the same as the default basemap in your ArcGIS Online organization. You can change the basemap for your map cards using the Basemaps menu button Basemaps on the page toolbar.

Note:

If a map card is activated then changing the basemap will update only the active card. If no map cards are active then all of the maps will have their basemap changed. A map card is active when you see the map toolbar and the Action button Action.

Add or remove a layer

Maps represent data from different datasets as separate layers. A new layer can be added to the map by dragging a field from a different dataset to the Add new layer drop zone on an existing map.

A layer can be deleted from a map by expanding the Layer options pane Expand legend and clicking the Delete button Delete. You can also temporarily turn off a layer on a map by clicking the layer symbol next to the layer name in the legend.

Use the map toolbar

Every map has a toolbar that can be used to find more information or manipulate the data or card.

ToolDescription

Legend Legend

The Legend button can be used to show or hide the name and symbol of datasets being displayed on the map. The legend also gives access to the Layer options for each dataset.

Card filter Card filter

The Card filter button can be used to remove any unwanted data from your chart. Filters can be applied to all string, number, rate/ratio, and date fields. A card filter does not affect other cards using the same dataset.

For more information, see Filter data.

Selection tools Selection tools

Selections can be used to highlight important features. Selections on one card are reflected on any other card using the same data. The following selection tools are available on map cards:

  • Select
  • Box select
  • Lasso
  • Zoom to selection
  • Invert selection

For more information, see Make selections.

Zoom tools Zoom tools

The Zoom tools can be used to change the extent of your data. The following Zoom tools can be used on map cards:

  • Zoom in
  • Zoom out
  • Zoom to selection

You can also zoom using Shift + click + drag, or return to the full extent of your data using the Default extent button Default extent.

Visualization type Visualization type

The Visualization type drop-down menu shows all available card types. The drop-down list can be used to quickly change your card to a summary table or chart. The availability of visualizations depends on what type of data is being displayed on your card.

Sync extents Sync extents

The Sync extents button can be used to display all maps at the same extent and zoom level.

Maximize Maximize

The Maximize button is used to enlarge the card. Other cards on the page will be reduced to thumbnails. The card can be returned to its previous size using the Restore down button Restore down.

Enable cross filters Enable cross filters

The Enable cross filters button is used to allow filters to be created on the card using selections on other cards. Cross filters can be removed using the Disable cross filters button Disable cross filters.

For more information, see Filter data.

Info Info

The Info button flips the card to display information about the layers on your map, such as the count of features, the timestamp for when the data was last updated, and the references for the basemap. There is also a space for you to describe the analysis on the card.

Delete Delete

The Delete button removes the card from your page. If you did not intend to delete your card, you can retrieve it using the Undo button.

Change the layer options

The Layer options pane can be accessed by clicking the arrow Expand legend in the layer list. The options in the Layer options pane are dependent on the type of data being mapped.

Legend tab

Each layer includes a legend, which can be found on the Legend tab of the Layer options pane. For layers styled by the Counts and Amounts (Size), Counts and Amounts (Color), and Types (Unique Symbols) symbol types, the legend will be interactive, meaning any selections you make in the legend will be reflected on the map. Each entry in the legend also includes a count of features and may include category or range values, depending on the Symbol Type.

Legend tab
The Legend tab of the Layer options pane displays the symbols and count for features in the layer. This legend is displaying the three unique values in the Type string field.

The Legend tab can be used to change the color of individual categories for maps symbolized by Types (Unique Symbols). To change the color associated with a category, click the symbol and choose a color from the palette or enter a hex value.

The map legend can be added to the page as a separate card. To create a legend, click the pop-out button Pop out legend on the Legend tab.

Options tab

The Options tab is used to change the field and type of symbols being used to style your map.

Options tab
The Options tab of the Layer options pane allows you to choose the field and symbol type used to style your layer. The Classification parameter is only available when using Counts and Amounts (Size) or Counts and Amounts (Color) for the Symbol Type parameter.

The following table summarizes all of the potential parameters for all types of data.

ParameterDescription

Style By

The Style By parameter depicts which field is being used to display the data on the map.

This property is available for all features with location, string, number, or rate/ratio field roles.

Symbol Type

The Symbol Type parameter determines how the points, lines, or areas appear on the map. Symbol Type options depend on the type of features and field role being mapped.

This property is available for all features.

Classification

Classification is the method of grouping numeric data into ranges. The classification methods include Natural Breaks, Equal Interval, Quantile, Standard Deviation, Unclassed, and Manual.

This property is available when using the Counts and Amounts (Color) or Counts and Amounts (Size) symbol type.

Style By

The Style By parameter depicts which field is being used to display the data on the map. You can use the drop-down menu to change the Style By parameter to a different field. You can also select a field from the layer being mapped in the data pane and drag the layer to the map to change the style.

Any field with a location, string, number, or rate/ratio field role can be used to style a layer. Date/Time fields cannot be styled on a map.

Symbol Type

Symbol types determine how symbols are rendered on your map. Options in the Symbol Type parameter reflect the supported map renderers in Insights. Smart mapping defines how symbol types are shown on a map based on the role of the field you're showing. The following table lists smart mapping symbol types supported by Insights, as well as the applicable field roles, and the maps they produce:

Symbol TypeFeaturesDescription

Counts and Amounts (Color)

Feature types: Points, lines, and areas

Field roles: Number and rate/ratio

The Counts and Amounts (Color) symbol type uses graduated colors to style numeric values. The color ramp used can be either sequential or diverging:

  • Sequential—A single color that ranges from light to dark is used to display data. Usually the data that has a more neutral meaning will be light, while higher values or values with more meaning will be dark.
  • Diverging—Two colors are used to display data with important meaning at both the low and high extremes. The colors have dark shades at the lower and upper extremes and neutral colors in the middle.

Using Counts and Amounts (Color) as the symbol type results in a choropleth map.

This is the default symbol type for rate/ratio fields.

Counts and Amounts (Size)

Feature types: Points, lines, and areas

Field roles: Number and rate/ratio

The Counts and Amounts (Size) symbol type uses graduated symbols to style numeric values. The symbol size will reflect the size of the numbers, with the smallest numbers being styled with the smallest symbols and the largest numbers being styled with the largest symbols.

Using Counts and Amounts (Size) as the symbol type results in a proportional symbol map.

This is the default symbol type for number fields.

Types (Unique Symbols)

Field roles: Location, string, number, and rate/ratio

The Types (Unique Symbols) symbol type uses a different color for every unique value in the field being symbolized. It is most common to use Types (Unique Symbols) when mapping categorical data (string fields) with relatively few unique field values.

Using Types (Unique Symbols) as the symbol type results in a unique values map.

This is the default symbol type for string fields.

Location (Single Symbol)

Feature types: Points, lines, and areas

Field roles: Location

The Location (Single Symbol) symbol type uses uniform symbols for all features. Styling features by location only helps you to focus on the distribution of features, rather than field values.

Using Location (Single Symbol) as the symbol type results in a location map.

This is the default symbol type for location fields.

Bins

Feature types: Points

Field roles: Location and number

The Bins symbol type uses points in the layer to calculate and display the relative density of points on the map as set of polygonal bins. Binned maps are styled by graduated colors. The color ramp used can be either sequential or diverging.

Heat Map

Feature types: Points

Field roles: Location, string, number, and rate/ratio

The Heat Map symbol type uses points in the layer to calculate and display the relative density of points on the map as smoothly varying sets of colors ranging from cool (low density of points) to hot (many points).

While smart mapping symbol types provide effective maps right away, sometimes you may want your map to use a predefined symbol type from an ArcGIS dataset (for example, an ArcGIS feature layer that shows crime incidents as point data in red). If your dataset originated from ArcGIS Online, you'll see the Original symbol type. This option allows you to revert to the original symbol settings for symbol color, shape, size, and transparency.

Classification

When you map numeric data using Counts and Amounts (Size) or Counts and Amounts (Color), numbers are automatically grouped into classes using the natural breaks classification method. Classification allocates observations into each class and uses graduated symbol size or color to represent the classes.

Classification methodDescription

Natural Breaks

Classes are based on natural groupings inherent in the data. This is the default classification.

The default number of bins is 5.

Equal Interval

Divides the range of attribute values into equal-sized subranges.

The default number of bins is 5.

Quantile

Divides the attributes into bins with equal numbers of features.

The default number of bins is 5.

Standard Deviation

Classifies a feature based on how much the feature's attributes vary from the mean.

The number of bins used will depend on your data.

Unclassed

Numeric data is displayed on a continuous scale, rather than in discrete classes.

There are no bins used in the Unclassed method.

Manual

Manually add class breaks that are appropriate for your data.

There are no bins used in the Manual method.

Divide by calculates a rate/ratio by dividing the number field you used to style your map by the number field you select from the list. This allows you to calculate a rate/ratio on the fly if your dataset doesn't already contain normalized data.

Note:

If you used a rate/ratio field, Divide by is not available because the field is already identified as a normalized field.

Style tab

After you choose your data and symbol type, you can adjust the style properties, such as color, shape, and transparency. The options on the Style tab will vary based on the symbol type and type of features.

Style tab
The Style tab includes parameters that can be used to customize the symbols for your layer. The parameter options are dependent on the choices for the Style By and Symbol Type parameters on the Options tab.

Pop-up tab

The Pop-up tab is used to view a list of attributes and values for one or more features selected in the layer. The Pop-up tab will only list simple attributes for selected features in the current layer.

Pop-up tab
The Pop-up tab displays attributes for selected features in the current layer.

Copy a map

A map card can be duplicated on a page by activating the card (a card is active when the Action button Action is visible) and using Ctrl+C to copy the card and Ctrl+V to paste it on the page.

Note:

Using copy and paste to duplicate cards is not supported in Microsoft Internet Explorer. For a list of other browsers that can be used, see Supported browsers.

A map card can be copied to a different page by dragging the card to the New Page tab New page or to an existing page. When a map is copied to a new page, the dataset will also be copied, if necessary, along with all of the processes used to create the map. The dataset will not be copied if it already exists on the new page unless one of the datasets contains a dataset filter, a calculated field, or a location field created by enabling location.

Next stepsNext steps

Use the following resources to learn more about maps: